Matching Articles"Fishery" (Total 105)

  • On 10 December 1894, two of Newfoundland and Labrador's three banks closed their doors and never opened them again.
  • The salt-cod fishery was a mainstay of Newfoundland and Labrador's economy throughout the 1800s.
    The salt-cod fishery was a mainstay of Newfoundland and Labrador's economy throughout the 19th century.
  • The salt-cod fishery was a mainstay of Newfoundland and Labrador's economy throughout the 1800s.
    The salt-cod fishery was a mainstay of Newfoundland and Labrador's economy throughout the 19th century.
  • The industrialization of Newfoundland and Labrador's fisheries during the 20th century dramatically changed the way fishing people in the province worked and lived.
    The industrialization of Newfoundland and Labrador's fisheries during the late 20th century changed the way people in the province worked and lived.
  • The steamer SS Adventure anchored at Fort Chimo (Kuujjuaq), Ungava Bay, 1909
    In the years before 1914 generally rising prices (including prices for seal products) helped make the Newfoundland economy comparatively buoyant.
  • Farming was most successful close to St. John's.
    Newfoundland and Labrador's climate and soil have not been conducive to agriculture, but outport isolation and poor fishery incomes have made farming crucial.
  • Although it is often described in different terms, the expedition that led to the discovery of Newfoundland was primarily an economic enterprise.
  • Decades of overfishing in Newfoundland and Labrador caused the northern cod stocks to collapse during the 1990s and resulted in a moratorium.
  • "A View of St. John's and Fort Townsend."
    European fishers had been working off Newfoundland and Labrador's coasts for about 100 years by the turn of the 17th century.
  • The Andrey Markin in St. John's. Built in 1977 in the USSR, it is one of the many trawlers of the former Soviet Union that have fished on the Grand Banks since the mid 1950's.
    The rise of the industrial, frozen fish sector did not solve all the problems of the fishery, as many had hoped.
  • Following Confederation, Newfoundland and Labrador shifted away from the preparation of saltfish on community flakes and towards the production of fresh/frozen groundfish products in company-owned plants.
    As fishing technology became more complex and efficient during the 20th century, it changed Newfoundland and Labrador's fishing industry
  • The cod fishery was a mainstay of Newfoundland and Labrador's economy throughout the 19th century.
    Throughout the nineteenth century, Newfoundland and Labrador's economy centred on its ability to export goods to foreign buyers.
  • Fishing families supplied a major part of their living by a ceaseless round of activity including keeping livestock.
    It became advantageous for Great Britain to have a fishery based in Newfoundland as conditions of market and competition changed.
  • Workers at a large processing plant in St. John's prepare fish for sales.
    In 1939, Newfoundland produced 1.5 million pounds of frozen groundfish. With the outbreak of World War II, however, the industry took off.
  • Seen here tied up in St. John's, the Sandra Gage is a typical Canadian offshore trawler operating on the Grand Banks.
    The years between 1940 and 1969 saw dramatic changes in the Newfoundland fishery.
  • The Carl Venture a typical Newfoundland longliner, moored to a pier in St. John's. It was built in Nippers Harbour, Notre Dame Bay.
    Almost from the beginning of the rise of the frozen fish industry in the early 1940s, the government began to offer assistance.
  • At the beginning of the 20th century the L.S.P.U. was the most successful union in Newfoundland and Labrador.
    Until well into the 20th century, Newfoundland's primary economic activity was in the fisheries.
  • Men were almost exclusively the catchers, but the fish was split, salted, laid out to dry and tended while drying by the whole family, with women bearing some of the heaviest burden.
    A brief history of work and labour, both paid and unpaid, in Newfoundland and Labrador.
  • The Canadian government imposed a moratorium on the Northern cod fishery on 2 July 1992. The closure ended almost 500 years of fishing activity in Newfoundland and Labrador.
    The fishery closure ended almost 500 years of fishing activity in Newfoundland and Labrador, where it put about 30,000 people out of work.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador's historic cod fisheries attracted local and international fishing fleets for almost five centuries before the Canadian government shut the industry down indefinitely in July 1992.
    Newfoundland and Labrador's historic cod fisheries attracted fishing fleets for five centuries before being shut down indefinitely.