Matching Articles"Military Garrison" (Total 9)

  • The British army did not practice a regular system of rotation or relief and, as a result, the quality of the soldiers was poor.
    Page two of a five page article providing information about what it was like to be a part of the garrison in 18th century Newfoundland.
  • This map shows Fort Townshend and Fort William. Soldiers were often not given enough food to feed their families so they began growing their own vegetables. The land around these forts was regularly used as garden plots.LegendA. Fort TownshendB. The TownC. The ChurchD. Fort William
    Page three of a five page article providing information about what it was like to be a part of the garrison in 18th century Newfoundland.
  • It was at sites like this one that soldiers would often work out of to supplement their incomes.
    Page four of a five page article providing information about what it was like to be a part of the garrison in 18th century Newfoundland.
  • From the logbook of H.M.S. Pegasus. A view of the town and harbour of Placentia.
    Page five of a five page article providing information about what it was like to be a part of the garrison in 18th century Newfoundland.
  • St. John's had about 1,000 permanent residents during the 1760s.
    Page one of a five page article providing information about what it was like to be a part of the garrison in 18th century Newfoundland.
  • A detail from "Panoramic View of St. John's, 1879." The Colonial Building was the site of several riots, including the riot of 1861.
    The role of the Garrison in Newfoundland between the years 1815 and 1870.
  • From the logbook of H.M.S.Pegasus. Plans for Fort Frederick were approved in 1715 and construction began in 1717.
    In 1870 an important chapter in the history of Newfoundland came to a close when the British government withdrew the military garrison at St. John's.
  • Discontent among sailors at the Nore led to a mutiny on May 12, 1797. This painting shows the leader, Richard Parker, handing the mutineers' terms to Vice-Admiral Buckner on board the battleship Sandwich.
    The most alarming military danger between 1793 and 1815 came from the British forces stationed at Newfoundland who would mutiny over grievances.
  • There was not a single governor of Plaisance who did not complain about the lack of soldiers and the mediocrity of those he did have.

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