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These pages were constructed by Andrew Woodland, a grade nine student at MacDonald Drive Junior High, St. John's, NF, under the guidance of Raymond Lambe, programmer consultant, Newfoundland and Labrador Heritage Web Site.

This is a Heritage Partner Project of the Newfoundland and Labrador Heritage Web Site.

Newfoundland Folk Architecture

The unique and striking architecture of Newfoundland has served to draw many tourists to the province. The Heritage Foundation of Newfoundland and Labrador has long recognized and been an advocate of architectural heritage as an important factor in the preservation of Newfoundland's cultural identity . The preservation of individual structures is crucial to the tourist industry, and the economic well being of communities.

Architectural heritage is not only of value to economic growth, it also contributes to social survival. If the value of what our ancestors built and the documentation of the skills used in constructing these buildings are recognized, then Newfoundland heritage in our Canadian society will be further enhanced.

Preserving our Past

Many people are drawn towards our beautiful old buildings and we, as Newfoundlanders, feel a strong pride that goes along with the wood and nails. The preservation of Newfoundland folk architecture in recent years has received deserving attention. In Bonavista, for example, the community college has developed a heritage carpentry course. Students learn how to reconstruct heritage houses, and as a result they are also enriched with the art of making traditional furniture. In Trinity, a number of local carpenters have revived the making of traditional windows and have created a market for these products throughout the province. Also, an inventory of Newfoundland folk homes is being compiled as part of a strategy to preserve Newfoundland's architectural heritage.

Location, Location, Location!

Due to the lifestyles of early Newfoundlanders, many of their houses were built upon hillsides and cliffs by the sea. This would allow for easy access to the water for fishing. This posed a problem for the fishermen since building on a steep incline was risky business. The houses were unstable and in heavy rains, very unpredictable. In 1973, a mud slide caused by heavy rains swept four houses built along a hillside into the harbour. Four children died that night. This is a dark side of Newfoundland folk architecture; our houses are subject to harsh environmental conditions.

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Partnered Project Heritage Web Site Project
Memorial University of Newfoundland