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Newfoundland & Labrador's Registered Heritage Structures

Alphabetical
Listing by Place


Heritage Tours

Supplementary
Articles

Location and
Information


Architectural Terms

Great Fire of 1892

Divergent Paths

Simplicity and
Survival



Gazetteer Applet

Supplementary Articles

This section supplements the descriptions, histories and tours of Newfoundland and Labrador's Registered Heritage Structures. It is designed to provide general and supplementary information on both the province and its architectural heritage.

The first article, "Location and Information," gives a general overview of the province's location in North America, including a depiction on a world map, and provides some general facts and figures on climate and population. Also provided for general reference is a glossary of "Architectural Terms" used in the articles on the various heritage structures. The forty-one definitions given, complete with sample illustrations, were provided by the Heritage Foundation of Newfoundland and Labrador.

In addition to general information, there are three essays providing the background and context for the descriptions and histories of the heritage structures. The first article concerns the Great Fire of 1892 that devastated much of the east-end and downtown areas in St. John's. Many of the Registered Heritage Structures in the city were built as a consequence of the fire.

The final two articles are adapted from previous works by Professor Shane O'Dea on the province's built heritage. The first of the articles, "Divergent Paths", concerns the development of Anglican and Catholic Church architecture in Newfoundland and Labrador. The second article, "Simplicity and Survival," is more general in scope and discusses the similarities and differences between the heritage structures built by people of English and Irish descent. Of particular interest is the discussion of the linhay room at the rear of many nineteenth century homes. Additionally, O'Dea's interpretation of the various roof styles is of special importance to many of the Registered Heritage Structures.

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