Fun and Games

Natural Environment:

Hangman Game

Crossword Puzzle

Sliding Puzzle (4x4)

Sliding Puzzle (3x3)


Aboriginal Peoples:

Memory Game

Hangman Game

Crossword
Puzzle 1


Crossword
Puzzle 2


Sliding Puzzle (4x4)

Sliding Puzzle (3x3)


Society, Economy and Culture:

Sliding Puzzle (4x4)

Sliding Puzzle (3x3)


Exploration and Settlement:

Memory Game

Hangman Game

Crossword Puzzle

Sliding Puzzle (4x4)

Sliding Puzzle (3x3)


The Arts:

Sliding Puzzle (4x4)

Sliding Puzzle (3x3)


Government and Politics:

Governors' Game

Additional Instructions

Faces and Facts - Sheet #1

Faces and Facts - Sheet #2


Hangman Game

Crossword Puzzle

Sliding Puzzle (4x4)

Sliding Puzzle (3x3)


Fun & Games Troubleshooter



Governors' Game: Faces and Facts - Sheet #2

Below are the pictures and clues for 9 of the 18 governors used in the Governors' Game. When playing the game, you see the clue and the picture but you have to pick the name out of a list. So take this opportunity to learn the faces and facts about each of these governors.


Major General Sir John Harvey (1841-46)
At the beginning of his term, this governor released several Roman Catholics who had been imprisoned during the election riots in the winter of 1840. In 1846, he left Newfoundland to accept the post as lieutenant-governor of Nova Scotia.

Colonel Sir John Gaspard Le Marchant (1847-52)
Opposed to Newfoundland gaining autonomous rule, this governor was forced to contend with lobbyists for Responsible Government. He attempted to introduce improved farming practices to the British colony. In 1852, he was appointed lieutenant-governor of Nova Scotia.

Sir Alexander Bannerman (1857-1864)
Referred to as "Sir Sandy" by some of his closest friends, this governor was a native of Aberdeen, Scotland. Before his appointment in Newfoundland, he had served as lieutenant-governor of Prince Edward Island and as governor of the Bahamas.

Sir Anthony Musgrave (1864-69)
During his tenure as governor, he worked to gain support for Confederation. He believed that a union with Canada would prove to be the best solution to the country's economic, social and political problems. Despite his efforts, Newfoundland did not join Confederation until the 20th century.

Sir Henry Berkeley Fitzhardinge Maxse (1881-83)
It was under his governorship that construction began on the trans-island railway. Married to a German woman, this governor preferred to spend much of his time in Germany rather than Newfoundland.

Sir Cavendish Boyle (1901-1904)
This governor wrote a poem Ode to Newfoundland which was later adopted as the national anthem. It was during his governorship that the first transatlantic wireless telegram was sent from Cornwall, England to St. John's, Newfoundland.

Sir Albert Joseph Walsh (1949)
This man was the first lieutenant-governor of Newfoundland. He was appointed as a transitory governor during Newfoundland's entry into Confederation with Canada. He served for only five months before resigning to accept a position as Chief Justice.

Sir Leonard Cecil Outerbridge (1949-1957)
Born in North Carolina, he had led a group of St. John's merchants in publicly supporting confederation during the 1948 referendum. This was a significant development, since it had been assumed that the business community was united in its backing of Responsible Government.

Arthur Maxwell House (1997-2002)
He was the tenth lieutenant governor of Newfoundland and Labrador. After attending Memorial University College, he obtained his medical degree from Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia.




Partnered Projects Site Map Search Heritage Web Site Home