Learning Outcomes

Curriculum Connections

Instructional Organizer

Extension Activities

Select Bibliography for Class Use

References


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PART 1: The Classroom Issue Referendum
PART 2: The Community Meeting
PART 3: Writing the Newspaper
PART 4: The Class Newfoundland Referendum
PART 5: Creating the Class Timeline Display
PART 6: Closure

PART 1: THE CLASSROOM ISSUE REFERENDUM

TIME:

30-40 minutes

SKILLS:

  • identifying main idea
  • sequencing events
  • synthesizing information
  • developing a referendum question
  • defining "referendum"

RESOURCES:

  • BLM 1-1: Voting Time at Canadiana School (one copy per pair of students)
  • BLM 1-2: Referendum Flow Chart (one copy per pair of students)

PROCESS:

Activity
Grouping - pairs

  1. Have students, in pairs, read the story "Voting Time at Canadiana School" (BLM 1-1).

  2. Ask each pair of students to complete Parts A and B of the Referendum Flow Chart (BLM 1-2). Steps 1, 2 and 4 are already complete. You may wish to have students use a highlighter or other system to mark the sequence of events on the story sheets. It is important for them to understand the sequence of events in a referendum campaign.

    Note that the chart asks students to provide a definition of a referendum. This definition should be drawn from the information in the story.

  3. Ask pairs of students to develop a referendum question or statement for their own class, and write it on Part C of the flow chart. Discuss with the class issues of importance to their school lives - for example, rules, dress codes, etc. - before having pairs decide on a referendum statement such as, "Students in this class should be permitted to chew and pop gum whenever they wish."

    Also discuss with the class reasons why such issues may or may not be put to the voters in a referendum.

Grouping - whole class
  1. Have the class compare and discuss referendum questions they have created.

EVALUATION

Evaluate Referendum Flow Charts. Do they show:

  • understanding of sequence of events?
  • a clear definition of "referendum"?
  • clearly written and unambiguous referendum statements or questions?



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