Matching Articles"Exploration" (Total 269)

  • Click on TABLE OF CONTENTS above to access a list of all Exploration and Settlement articles.

  • A history of the Newfoundland settlement, Placentia, from difficult beginnings in 1662 to the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713.
  • There was not a single governor of Plaisance who did not complain about the lack of soldiers and the mediocrity of those he did have.
  • Population of Plaisance--Exploration--Newfoundland and Labrador Heritage Web
  • Information on seasonal fisherman that came to Newfoundland to fish for the summer.
  • A List of the Planters' Names, etc., in Ferryland and Caplin Bay, 1675
  • An Account of Planters in Ferryland and Caplin Bay, 1681
  • At some time during the 17th century the settlement at Ferryland began to spread beyond the original four-acre town site. One such house, located east of the original settlement on the Ferryland Downs, was excavated during the mid-1990s.
  • A Ferryland legend of long standing held that a well existed somewhere in the vicinity of our excavations. The story relates how the well had stood abandoned long after its use as a water source, and that a child had fallen into the well and drowned.
  • Every fishing property usually included a planter's house, a store with goods and supplies, and cabins for fishing equipment and the crews.
  • The Portuguese pioneered the European exploration of the Atlantic Ocean. Some historians believe that Portuguese mariners reached Newfoundland before Cabot.
  • There are those who claim that the Basques, the Portuguese, the Scots and the Welsh have made voyages to Newfoundland before Cabot.
  • Archaeologists, who thought that the 'prettie streete' would be little more than a dirt track meandering through the settlement, were surprised in 1994 to find the first traces of a cobblestone pavement near the western edge of the original settlement.
  • Extract from Acts by the Privy Council, dated June 14, 1639, and dealing with planters, food, and material culture.
  • In 1763 French authorities reclaimed possession of the islands (St. Pierre and Miquelon) and re-established a small French resident population.
  • The quarrel between Great Britain and its North American colonies had been brewing for some time, but no one expected a revolt to break out in 1775.
  • It would be misleading to assume that the revolution had no ill-effect on the fisheries.
  • Many thought the Revolution to be an opportunity to eliminate American competition in the supply trade, even though many residents suffered hardships.
  • Despite the hardships caused by the American Revolution, or because of them, Newfoundland showed little interest or sympathy for the American cause.
  • Account Book entry for Doctor Richard Amass [Richard Amiss], Ferryland, Newfoundland
  • Extract from a letter to John Winthrop, Jr. from Rev. Richard Blinman, dated August 22, 1659, and dealing with religion, the Puritan Church, cod, fisheries, ships, and servants.