PDF Version Available

FRANCE. No. 1 (1904).



DESPATCH


TO


HIS MAJESTY'S AMBASSADOR AT PARIS


FORWARDING


AGREEMENTS


BETWEEN


GREAT BRITAIN AND FRANCE


OF


APRIL 8, 1904.




Presented to both Houses of Parliament by Command of His Majesty.
April
1904.




LONDON:
PRINTED  FOR  HIS  MAJESTY'S  STATIONERY  OFFICE,

BY HARRISON AND SONS, ST. MARTIN'S LANE,
PRINTERS  IN  ORDINARY  TO  HIS  MAJESTY.


And to be purchased, either directly or through any Bookseller, from
EYRE & SPOTTISWOODE, EAST HARDING STREET, FLEET STREET, E.C.,
AND 32, ABINGDON STREET, WESTMINSTER, S.W.;
OR  OLIVER & BOYD, EDINBURGH;
OR  E. PONSONBY, 116, GRAFTON STREET, DUBLIN.

[Cd. 1952.]   Price 3d.



TABLE OF CONTENTS.


   Page  
The Marquess of Lansdowne to Sir E. Monson, April 8, 19041

Inclosure 1.   Declaration respecting Egypt and Morocco, signed at London, April 8, 1904

9

    Annex.   Draft Decree

12

Inclosure 2.   Convention signed at London, April 8, 1904 [between the United Kingdom and France respecting Newfoundland, and West and Central Africa]

20

Inclosure 3.   Declaration concerning Siam, Madagascar, and the New Hebrides, signed at London, April 8, 1904

26




p. 1

The Marquess of Lansdowne to Sir E. Monson.


Foreign Office, April 8, 1904.

Sir,

I HAVE from time to time kept your Excellency fully informed of the progress of my negotiations with the French Ambassador for the complete settlement of a series of important questions in which the interests of Great Britain and France are involved. These negotiations commenced in the spring of last year, and have been continued with but slight interruptions up to the present time.

Such a settlement was notoriously desired on both sides of the Channel, and the movement in its favour received a powerful impulse from the visit paid to France by His Majesty King Edward VII in May last and by the return visit of President Loubet to this country. Upon the latter occasion, the President was accompanied by the distinguished Statesman who has so long presided over the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs. It is a matter for congratulation that his presence afforded to His Majesty's Government the great advantage of a full and frank exchange of ideas. It left us in no doubt that a settlement of the kind which both Governments desired, and one which would be mutually advantageous to both countries, was within our reach.

The details of the questions at issue have since been examined in confidential discussions with the French Ambassador, to whose personal knowledge of many of the points involved and wide diplomatic experience it is largely due that I am now able to announce to you the Agreement which has been arrived at. I inclose copies of the Convention and Declarations which were signed to-day by his Excellency and myself.

Among the questions which it has been our duty to examine, that of the position of Great Britain in Egypt and of France in Morocco have necessarily occupied a foremost place.

From a British point of view there is no more remarkable episode in recent history than that which concerns the establishment and the gradual development of British influence in Egypt. Our occupation of that country, at first regarded as temporary, has by the force of circumstances become firmly established. Under the guidance of the eminent public Servant who has for the last twenty years represented His Majesty's Government in that country, Egypt has advanced by rapid strides along the path of financial and material prosperity. The destruction of the power of the Mandi and the annexation of the Soudan have increased that influence and added to the stability of our occupation.

But while these developments have, in fact, rapidly modified the international situation in Egypt, the financial and administrative system which prevails is a survival of an order of things which no longer exists, and is not only out of date but full of inconvenience to all concerned. It is based on the very elaborate and intricate provisions of the Law of Liquidation of 1880, and the London Convention of 1885. With the financial and material improvement of Egypt, these provisions have become a hindrance instead of an aid to the development of the resources of the country. The friction, inconvenience, and actual loss to the Egyptian Treasury which it has occasioned have been pointed out by Lord Cromer on many occasions in his annual Reports. It is well described in the following passage which occurs in Lord Milner's standard work on Egypt:—


p. 2

“The spectacle of Egypt, with her Treasury full of money, yet not allowed to use that money for an object which, on a moderate calculation, should add 20 per cent. to the wealth of the country, is as distressing as it is ludicrous. Every year that passes illustrates more forcibly the injustice of maintaining, in these days of insured solvency, the restrictions imposed justifiable upon the financial freedom of the Egyptian Government at a time of bankruptcy—restrictions then, but wholly unjustifiable now. No one would object to the continuance of the arrangement by which certain revenues are paid in the first instance to the Caisse de la Dette. But as long as these revenues suffice to cover the interest on the Debt and to provide any sinking fund which the Powers may deem adequate, the balance ought simply to be handed over to the Egyptian Government to deal with as it pleases, and the antiquated distinction of 'authorized' and 'unauthorized' expenditure should be swept away. No reform is more necessary than this, if the country is to derive the greatest possible benefit from the improved condition of its finances which has been attained by such severe privations.”

The functions of the Caisse, originally limited to receiving certain assigned revenues on behalf of the bondholders, have in practice become much more extensive. Its members have claimed to control, on behalf of the Powers of Europe, the due execution by the Egyptian Government of all the complicated international Agreements regarding the finances of the country. Their assent is necessary before any new loan can be issued. No portion of the General Reserve Fund can be used without their sanction; and all assigned revenues are paid directly to them by the collecting Departments without passing through the Ministry of Finance. In the same way, the receipts of the railways, telegraphs, and port of Alexandria, administered by a Board consisting of three members—an Englishman, a Frenchman, and an Egyptian—are paid, after deduction of the expenses, into the Caisse.

The inconvenience of the arrangements which I have described has not been contested by the French Government, and they have shown themselves fully disposed to concert with us the means of bringing the system of financial administration into more close accord with the facts as they now present themselves.

The case of Morocco presents different features. The condition of that country has for a long time been unsatisfactory and fraught with danger. The authority of the Sultan over a large portion of his dominions is that of a titular Chief rather than of a Ruler. Life and property are unsafe, the natural resources of the country are undeveloped, and trade, though increasing, is hampered by the political situation.

In these respects the contrast between Morocco and Egypt is marked. In spite of well-meant efforts to assist the Sultan, but little progress has been effected, and at this moment the prospect is probably as little hopeful as it has ever been. Without the intervention of a strong and civilized Power there appears to be no probability of a real improvement in the condition of the country.

It seems not unnatural that, in these circumstances, France should regard it as falling to her lot to assume the task of attempting the regeneration of the country. Her Algerian possessions adjoin those of the Sultan throughout the length of a frontier of several hundred miles. She has been compelled from time to time to undertake military operations of considerable difficulty, and at much cost, in order to put an end to the disturbances which continually arise amongst tribes adjoining the Algerian frontier—tribes which, although nominally the subjects of the Sultan, are, in fact, almost entirely beyond his control. The trade of France with Morocco is again—if that across the Algerian frontier be included—of considerable importance, and compares not unfavourably with our own. In these circumstances, France, although in no wise desiring to annex the Sultan's dominions or to subvert his authority, seeks to extend her influence in Morocco, and is ready to submit to sacrifices and to incur responsibilities with the object of putting an end to the condition of anarchy which prevails upon the borders of Algeria.

His Majesty's Government are not prepared to assume such responsibilities, or to make such sacrifices, and they have therefore readily admitted that if any European Power is to have a predominant influence in Morocco, that Power is France. They have, on the other hand, not lost sight of the fact that Great Britain also has interests in Morocco which must be safeguarded in any arrangement to be arrived at between France and Great Britain. The first of these has reference to the facilities to be afforded to our commerce, as well as to that of other countries, in Morocco. Our imports to that country amount to a considerable percentage of the whole; and it is obvious that, given improved methods of administration, a reform of the currency, And cheaper land transport, foreign trade with Morocco should be largely increased—an increase in which British merchants would certainly look to have their share.

The rights and privileges of Great Britain in Morocco in respect of commercial affairs are regulated by the Convention of Commerce and Navigation concluded


p. 3

between the two countries in December 1856, and the rights of British subjects to reside or travel in the dominions of the Sultan are provided for in the general Treaty between the two countries of the same year.

The Convention entitles British subjects to trade freely in the Sultan's dominions on the same terms as natives or subjects of the most favoured nation, and stipulates that their right to buy and sell is not to be restrained or prejudiced by any monopoly, contract, or exclusive privilege, save as regards a limited number of imported articles, which are specifically mentioned.

The Treaty gives to British subjects the right of residing or travelling in the dominions of the Sultan, and further entitles the British Government to appoint Consular officers at the cities and ports in Morocco, and establishes Consular jurisdiction over British subjects, besides providing for the usual privileges in respect of the right of British subjects to hire dwellings and warehouses, and to acquire and dispose of property, for their exemption from military service and forced loans, and for the security of their persons and property.

It would have been impossible for His Majesty's Government to consent to any arrangement which did not leave these rights intact and the avenues of trade completely open to British enterprise.

A second condition which His Majesty's Government regard as essential is also readily accepted by the French Government. It has reference to certain portions of the Moorish littoral, upon which both Governments desire that no Power shall be allowed to establish itself or to erect fortifications or strategical works of any kind.

A third condition has reference to Spain. An adequate and satisfactory recognition of Spanish interests, political and territorial, has been from the first, in the view of His Majesty's Government, an essential element in any settlement of the Morocco question.

Spain has possessions on the Moorish coast, and the close proximity of the two countries has led to a reasonable expectation on the part of the Spanish Government and people that Spanish interests would receive special consideration in any arrangement affecting the future of Morocco.

His Majesty's Government have observed with satisfaction that, so far as the principle involved is concerned, the two Governments are in entire accord, and that it is the object of the French, as it is that of the British Government, to insure that the special consideration, which both agree is due to Spain, shall be shown in respect of questions of form no less than in respect of her material interests.

The Declaration, of which a copy is attached to this despatch, embodies the terms upon which the two Governments propose to deal with the cases of Egypt and Morocco respectively.

The first, and from the point of view of Great Britain the most important, part of the Agreement which has been concluded in respect of Egypt is the recognition by the French Government of the predominant position of Great Britain in that country. They fully admit that the fulfilment of the task upon which we entered in 1883 must not be impeded by any suggestion on their part that our interest in Egypt is of a temporary character, and they undertake that, so far as they are concerned, we shall not be impeded in the performance of that task. This under-taking will enable us to pursue our work in Egypt without, so far as France is concerned, arousing international susceptibilities. It is true that the other Great Powers of Europe also enjoy, in virtue of existing arrangements, a privileged position in Egypt; but the interests of France—historical, political, and financial—so far outweigh those of the other Powers, with the exception of Great Britain, that so long as we work in harmony with France, there seems no reason to anticipate difficulty at the hands of the other Powers.

The importance of this engagement cannot be overrated. Although the attitude of the French Government in regard to Egyptian questions has been considerably modified of late years—in great measure owing to the harmonious relations which have recently prevailed between the Representatives of the two countries in Cairo—the possibility of French opposition has had, nevertheless, constantly to be taken into account; its disappearance will be an unqualified benefit to both Governments, and will greatly facilitate the progress of the task which we have undertaken in Egypt.

It has long been clear that, in the interests of all parties, it was desirable to introduce very considerable modifications in the international arrangements, established in Egypt for the protection of foreign bondholders. The new Khedivial Decree annexed to the Declaration and accepted by the French Government will, if it be accepted by the other Powers concerned, have the effect of giving to the Egyptian


p. 4

Government a free hand in the disposal of its own resources so long as the punctual payment of interest on the Debt is assured. The Caisse de la Dette will still remain, but its functions will be strictly limited to receiving certain assigned revenues on behalf of the bondholders, and insuring the due payment of the coupon. The Caisse will, as soon as the Decree has come into operation, have no right and no opportunity of interfering in the general administration of the country. The branches of revenue assigned to the service of the Debt have also been changed, and the land tax has been substituted for the customs duties and railway receipts. This arrangement will give the bondholders the advantage of having; their rights secured on the most stable and certain branch of the Egyptian revenue, and one which shows a constant tendency to increase. On the other hand, the Egyptian Government will no longer be hampered in the administration of the customs and railways, and, as a corollary, the mixed administration which has hitherto controlled the railways, telegraphs, and port of Alexandria, will disappear.

The fund derived from the economies of the conversion of 1890, which since that date has been uselessly accumulated in the coffers of the Caisse, and which now amounts to 5,500,0001., will be handed over to the Egyptian Government, who will be free to employ it in whatever way most conduces to the welfare of the people.

Though we still maintain our view as to the right of the Egyptian Government to pay off the whole of their debt at any time after 1905, the French Government have strongly urged the claims of the bondholders to special consideration in view of the past history of the Egyptian Debt. In order to meet their wishes in this matter the present arrangement provides that the conversion of the Guaranteed and Privileged Debt shall be postponed till 1910 and the conversion of the Unified Debt till 1912—a postponement which confers a very material advantage on the existing bondholders, and should remove all grounds of complaint whenever the conversion is carried through.

The Decree abolishes various other provisions of the old Law which experience has shown to be unnecessary and inconvenient. It will be sufficient to mention the two most important of these. In the first place, the consent of the Caisse will no longer be necessary in the event of the Egyptian Government desiring to raise further loans for productive expenditure or for other reasons. In the second place, the plan devised in the London Convention of fixing a limit to the administrative expenditure of the Egyptian Government has been swept away. The manifold inconvenience, and even loss, to which this system has given rise in a country which is in the process of development, and where, consequently, new administrative needs are constantly making themselves felt, have been frequently pointed out by Lord Cromer.

Your Excellency will not fail to observe that the Khedivial Decree in which these measures are embodied will require the consent of Austria, Germany, Italy, and Russia before it can be promulgated by the Egyptian Government. The amount of the Egyptian Debt held in these countries is, however, quite insignificant. France and Great Britain, indeed, between them hold nearly the whole of the Debt, with the exception of the small proportion which is held in Egypt itself. In these circumstances it is reasonable to hope that no serious difficulties will he encountered in other quarters regarding proposals which are considered by the two Governments as giving entire satisfaction to the legitimate interests of the bondholders, and which those two Governments are formally pledged to support. Should, however, unexpected obstacles present themselves, we shall, in virtue of our Agreement with France, be able to count upon the support of French diplomacy in our endeavours to overcome them.

It is necessary that I should add a few words as to the other points in which the internal rights of sovereignty of the Egyptian Government are subject to international interference. These are the consequences of the system known as that of the Capitulations. It comprises the jurisdiction of the Consular Courts and of the Mixed Tribunals, the latter applying a legislation which requires the consent of all the European Powers, and some extra-European Powers, before it can be modified. In Lord Cromer's opinion the time is not ripe for any organic changes in this direction and His Majesty's Government have not, therefore, on the present occasion, proposed any alterations in this respect. At the same time, whenever Egypt is ready for the introduction of a legislative and judicial system similar to that which exists in other civilized countries, we have sufficient grounds for counting upon French co-operation in effecting the necessary changes.

It will be observed that an Article has been inserted in the Agreement declaring


p. 5

the adhesion of His Majesty's Government to the Treaty of the 29th October, 1888, providing for the neutrality of the Suez Canal in time of war. In consequence of the reservation made by Lord Salisbury at the time respecting the special situation of this country during the occupation of Egypt, some doubt existed as to the extent to which Great Britain considered herself bound by the stipulations of the Convention. It appears desirable to dissipate any possible misunderstanding by specifically declaring the adhesion of His Majesty's Government. It is, however, provided that certain executive stipulations which are incompatible with Lord Salisbury's reservation should remain in abeyance during the continuance of the occupation.

In regard to Morocco, your Excellency will find that the Convention contains the following stipulations on the part of the two Powers: the Government of the French Republic places upon record a Declaration that it has no intention of disturbing the political status of Morocco; that the rights which Great Britain enjoys in virtue of Treaties and Conventions and usage are to be respected; and that British commerce, including goods in transit through French territory and destined for the Moorish market, is to be treated on a footing of absolute equality with that of France. His Majesty's Government, on the other hand, recognize that it belongs to France to maintain order in Morocco, and to assist the Moorish Government in improving the administrative, economic, financial, and military conditions of that country.

The two Governments undertake a mutual obligation to construct no fortifications themselves, and to allow no other Power to construct fortifications on the more important portions of the Moorish sea-board.

Finally, with regard to Spain, both Governments place on record their admission that that country has exceptional interests in certain portions of Morocco, and that those interests are to be respected by both Powers alike. The French Government has undertaken to come to an understanding with that of Spain as to the mode in which effect can best be given to this stipulation, and to communicate to the Government of His Majesty the terms of the Arrangement which may be made with this object.

Your Excellency is familiar with the circumstances which confront us in the Colony of Newfoundland.

The Treaty of Utrecht (1713) by Article XIII recognized that the Island of Newfoundland should thenceforth belong wholly to Great Britain, but it gave to the French “the right to catch fish and to dry them on land on that part of the coast which stretches from Cape Bonavista to the northern point of the island, and from thence running down by the western side to Point Riche.” They were not to erect any buildings there besides stages made of boards and huts necessary and usual for drying fish, or to resort to the island beyond the time necessary for fishing and drying of fish. This right was renewed and confirmed by Article V of the Treaty of Paris, 1763.

By the Treaty of Versailles, 1783, the French renounced their right of fishing from Cape Bonavista to Cape St. John on the east coast, and acquired the right to fish from Cape St. John on the east coast to Cape Ray on the west, passing by the north. This change was made in order to prevent the frequent quarrels which took place between the fishermen of the two nations. With the same object Great Britain undertook, in the Declaration of the 30th September, 1783, appended to the Treaty, that measures should be taken to prevent British subjects from interrupting in any manner, by their competition, the fishery of the French during the temporary exercise of it granted to them by the Treaties, and that fixed settlements by the British on the portion of the coast above described should be removed.

Great diversities of opinion have arisen between the two Governments as to the interpretation of these stipulations. To summarize the chief heads of the dispute, the French have contended that the Treaties give them an exclusive right of fishery on the coast mentioned, and that all British fixed settlements, of whatever nature, on the coast are contrary to the Treaties. On the other hand, the British contention has been that British subjects have the right to fish concurrently with the French, provided that they do not interrupt them, and that the fixed settlements referred to in the British Declaration of 1783 are fixed fishing settlements only, and that other fixed settlements are not contrary to the Declaration.

Periodical attempts have been made since 1844 to dispose of the various questions arising out of these differences. Negotiations for the purpose were undertaken successively in 1857, 1860, 1874, 1881, and 1885, but without success. On two occasions—in 1857 and 1885—Conventions were actually signed limiting the area within which the French rights were to be exercised, and, in return, acknowledging those rights and conceding some further privileges. These arrangements were, however, viewed with


p. 6

such strong disapproval by the Colonial Legislature that they were in both cases abandoned and were never ratified.

On each occasion the failure of the arrangement was succeeded by a renewed assertion of the French rights in their extremest form, and instructions were issued to the French cruisers stationed off the coast which threatened to lead to a serious rupture.

The Bait Act, which was passed by the Newfoundland Legislature in 1886, and enforced in 1887, and by which the sale of bait to French fishing vessels on all parts of the shore not affected by the Treaties was prohibited, was a fresh source of irritation, and gave rise to fresh controversies.

The French, restricted in their supply of this essential material for the pursuit of the cod-fishery, resorted in considerable numbers to the establishment of lobster fisheries on the portion of the coast reserved to them, and contested the legality of the British lobster factories which had long been established there. The British Government, on the other hand, contended, on behalf of the Colony, that the taking and preserving of lobsters were not included in the privileges conceded to French fishermen by the Treaties.

The negotiations which ensued on this question resulted in the establishment in 1890 of a modus vivendi, under which both parties were allowed to take part in the lobster fishery, under certain restrictions. These, however, have proved inconvenient in their practical working, and do not afford means for the necessary protection of the fishery from deterioration by excessive destruction of the lobsters.

In 1891 an Agreement was arrived at between the two Governments for referring to arbitration the questions in dispute with regard to the lobster fishery. This, again, has never been acted upon, in consequence of the refusal of the Colonial Government and Legislature to comply with the condition made by the French Government that the necessary legislation for carrying the award into effect should first be passed.

In 1901 a fresh attempt was made to effect a settlement, but the negotiation was again unsuccessful, as the Colony declined to make concessions in regard to the sale of bait unless the French system of bounties on the sale of fish by their citizens were abandoned or at least modified in important particulars.

The summary which I have given is sufficient to show how constant a source of risk and anxiety this question has been.

It was obviously our duty to find some means of terminating the condition of things which I have described. It has been fraught with inconvenience to all concerned. It has involved a constant risk of collisions between the two Governments, in consequence of disputes as to the rights of persons engaged in the fishing industry, both on shore and at sea. Such collisions have, in fact, been averted only by the tact, moderation, and good temper exhibited by the naval officers of both Powers, to whose cognizance these local disputes have in the first instance been brought.

As for the shore, no land has, up to the present time, been leased or granted on the Treaty Shore except in terms which require the lessee or grantee to comply with the stipulations of the Treaties, and with any orders by the Crown for their enforcement; so long, therefore, as any possible doubts remained as to the security of tenure on the parts of the coast affected, capitalists could not embark freely on the development of its resources. Indeed, if the French view were correct, and had been strictly enforced, it would have been impossible to develop them at all.

It is, therefore, no exaggeration to say that to the Colony the existence of these French rights throughout an extent representing some two-fifths of the whole coast-line of the island have meant the obstruction of all useful local developments as well as of mining and other industrial enterprises.

Under the Convention which has been concluded it is provided that the French rights of landing on the Treaty Shore conferred by Article XIII of the Treaty of Utrecht shall be once and for all abandoned.

For this abandonment His Majesty's Government recognize that compensation is due both to the persons actually engaged in the fishing industry and to the French nation.

The former will be obliged to remove their property from the Treaty Shore, and to give up the premises which they have there erected. For the loss thus inflicted on them, and for any loss clearly due to the compulsory abandonment of their business, compensation will be paid to individuals. A simple and expeditious form of procedure has been adopted for determining the amount of these indemnities. But irrespectively of this question of personal compensation, the French Government claim with reason that they are required to renounce on behalf of the nation a privilege which cannot


p. 7

be estimated merely at its present pecuniary value. On grounds, therefore, of sentiment, as well as of interest, they cannot be expected to surrender it unless they are able to show that they have secured an adequate equivalent elsewhere.

To meet this legitimate view we have offered to France at various points concessions of importance to her, but which can in our opinion be granted without detriment to British interests.

These are:—
  (a.) A rectification of the Eastern frontier of the Colony of the Gambia, which will give to France an access to the navigable portion of that river.
  (b.) The cession of a small group of islands known as the Iles de Los, situated opposite to Konakry. These islands are of small extent and of no intrinsic value. Their geographical position, however, connects them closely with French Guinea, and their possession by any Power other than France might become a serious menace to that Colony.
  (c.) A modification of the boundary fixed between the French and British possessions in Nigeria by the Convention of the 14th June, 1898. The line then laid down has had the effect of compelling French convoys, when proceeding from the French possessions on the Niger to those in the neighbourhood of Lake Chad, to follow a circuitous and waterless route, so inconvenient that they have been obliged to obtain permission to pass by a shorter and less inconvenient way through British territory. The new boundary will bring to France an accession of territory, the importance of which is due mainly to the fact that it gives her the use of a direct route between the points which I have mentioned.

An Agreement has also been come to with the French Government in regard to the interests of the two Powers in the neighbourhood of Siam. It will be in your Excellency's recollection that by an Agreement arrived at in 1896, France and Great Britain undertook to refrain from any armed intervention, or the acquisition of special privileges, in the Siamese possessions which were included within the basin of the Menam River. It was explained by my predecessor that the restriction of the undertaking thus given did not imply any doubts as to the validity of the Siamese title to those portions of her possessions which lay outside the Menam Valley. To this view His Majesty's Government adhere. The Agreement of 1896 has none the less been regarded as implying that the relations of the two Powers to Siam and to one another in respect to the regions lying to the east and to the west of the guaranteed area differed from their relations to her and to one another in respect of the central portion of the kingdom. In point of fact, British influence has for some time past prevailed in the western, and French influence in the eastern, portions of the Siamese dominions. The Agreements which have been entered into with Siam by His Majesty's Government as to the Malay Peninsula, and by the French Government as to the Mekong Valley, show that the two Powers have each on its side considered themselves at liberty to acquire a preponderating influence in those parts of the Siamese Empire.

The exercise of such influence is compatible with the absence of all idea annexing Siamese territory, and in order that this may be made abundantly clear, both parties to the Convention have placed it on record that neither of them desire to take for themselves any portion of the possessions of the King of Siam, and that they are determined to maintain the obligations which they have incurred under existing Treaties.

These Treaties, as your Excellency is aware, entitle Great Britain to most-favoured-nation treatment in all parts of the Siamese dominions.

Advantage has been taken of this opportunity to further regularize the position of Great Britain in Zanzibar and of France in Madagascar, and the two Powers have intimated their intention of endeavouring to arrive at an arrangement for putting an have end to the difficulties which have risen in the New Hebrides in consequence of the absence of any effectual mode of settling disputes as to land titles in those islands.

In the preceding observations I have endeavoured to give some account of the reasons for which, in the opinion of His Majesty's Government, the Agreements which have been concluded are, if considered by themselves and on their intrinsic merits, believed to be desirable.

It is, however, important to regard them not merely as a series of separate transactions, but as forming part of a comprehensive scheme for the improvement of the international relations of two great countries.


p. 8

From this point of view their cumulative effect can scarcely fail to be advantageous in a very high degree. They remove the sources of long-standing differences, the existence of which has been a chronic addition to our diplomatic embarrassments and a standing menace to an international friendship which we have been at much pains to cultivate, and which, we rejoice to think, has completely overshadowed the antipathies and suspicions of the past.

There is this further reason for mutual congratulation. Each of the parties has been able, without any material sacrifice of its own national interests, to make to the other concessions regarded, and rightly regarded, by the recipient as of the highest importance.

The French privilege of drying fish on the Treaty Shore of Newfoundland has, for example, been lately of but little value to the persons engaged in the industry; but the existence of that privilege may be said to have, so far as our Newfoundland colonists are concerned, sterilized a great part of the littoral of the Colony.

Similarly, in Egypt the rights accruing to the French Government under the laws of 1879, 1880, and subsequent years, have not really conferred any practical benefits either upon the French nation or upon the French holders of Egyptian securities, but the existence of those rights has been a constant hindrance in the way of Egyptian administration, and has seriously retarded the progress of the country.

In Morocco His Majesty's Government have been able to gratify the natural aspirations of France, and have willingly conceded to her a privileged position, which, owing to her geographical situation, she is specially competent to occupy; but they have done this upon conditions which secure for our commerce an absolute equality of opportunity, which guarantee the neutrality of the most important portions of its sea-board, and which provide for the due recognition of Spanish requirements, which they have from the first desired to see treated with due respect.

In Siam, again, they have admitted the preponderance of France within an area over which she has, in fact, of late years, exercised a preponderating influence, and with which they have neither the desire nor the opportunity to interfere. They have, on the other hand, obtained the recognition of a corresponding British preponderance at points where they could not have tolerated the interference of another Power, and where the influence of this country has in fact already been established with the best results.

For these reasons it is fair to say that, as between Great Britain and France, the arrangement, taken as a whole, will be to the advantage of both parties.

Nor will it, we believe, be found less advantageous if it be regarded from the point of view of the relations of the two Powers with the Governments of Egypt, Morocco, and Siam. In each of these countries it is obviously desirable to put an end to a system under which the Ruler has had to shape his course in deference to the divided counsels of two great European Powers. Such a system, leading, as it must, to intrigue, to attempts to play one Power off against the other, and to undignified competition, can scarcely fail to sow the seeds of international discord, and to bring about a state of things disadvantageous and demoralizing alike to the tutelary Powers, and to the weaker State which forms the object of their solicitude. Something will have been gained if the understanding happily arrived at between Great Britain and France should have the effect of bringing this condition of things to an end in regions where the interests of those two Powers are specially involved. And it may, perhaps, be permitted to them to hope that, in thus basing the composition of long-standing differences upon mutual concessions, and in the frank recognition of each other's legitimate wants and aspirations, they may have afforded a precedent which will contribute something to the maintenance of international goodwill and the preservation of the general peace.


I am, &c.          
(Signed)       LANSDOWNE.   




p. 9

Inclosure 1.

Declaration respecting Egypt and Morocco.

ARTICLE I.

HIS Britannic Majesty's Government declare that they have no intention of altering the political status of Egypt.

The Government of the French Republic, for their part, declare that they will not obstruct the action of Great Britain in that country by asking that a limit of time be fixed for the British occupation or in any other manner, and that they give their assent to the draft Khedivial Decree annexed to the present Arrangement, containing the guarantees considered necessary for the protection of the interests of the Egyptian bondholders, on the condition that, after its promulgation, it cannot be modified in any way without the consent of the Powers Signatory of the Convention of London of 1885.


It is agreed that the post of Director-General of Antiquities in Egypt shall continue, as in the past, to be entrusted to a French savant.

The French schools in Egypt shall continue to enjoy the same liberty as in the past.

ARTICLE II.

The Government of the French Republic declare that they have no intention of altering the political status of Morocco.

His Britannic Majesty's Government, for their part, recognize that it appertains to France, more particularly as a Power whose dominions are conterminous for a great distance with those of Morocco, to preserve order in that country, and to provide assistance for the purpose of all administrative, economic, financial, and military reforms which it may require.

They declare that they will not obstruct the action taken by France for this purpose, provided that such action shall leave intact the rights which Great Britain, in virtue of Treaties, Conventions, and usage, enjoys in Morocco, including the right of coasting trade between the ports of Morocco, enjoyed by British vessels since 1901.

ARTICLE III.

His Britannic Majesty's Government, for their part, will respect the rights which
ARTICLE I.

LE Gouvernement de Sa Majesté Britannique déclare qu'il n'a pas l'intention de changer 1'état politique de l'Égypte.

De son côté, le Gouvernement de la République Française déclare qu'il n'entravera pas 1'action de l'Angleterre dans ce pays en demandant qu'un terme soit fixé à l'occupation Britannique ou de toute autre manière, et qu'il donne son adhésion au projet de Décret Khédivial qui est annexé an présent Arrangement, et qui contient les garanties jugées nécessaires pour la sauvegarde des intérêts des porteurs de la Dette Égyptienne, mais à la condition qu'après sa mise en vigueur aucune modification n'y pourra être introduite sans l'assentiment des Puissances Signataires de la Convention de Londres de 1885.

Il est convenu que la Direction-Générale des Antiquités en Égypte continuera d'être, comme par le passé, confiée à un savant Français.

Les écoles Françaises en Égypte continueront à jouir de la même liberté que par le passé.

ARTICLE II.

Le Gouvernement de la République Française déclare qu'il n'a pas l'intention de changer l'état politique du Maroc.

De son côté, le Gouvernement de Sa Majesté Britannique reconnaît qu'il appartient à la France, notamment comme Puissance limitrophe du Maroc sur une vaste étendue, de veiller à la tranquillité dans ce pays, et de lui prêter son assistance pour toutes les réformes administratives, économiques, financières, et militaires dont il a besoin.

Il déclare qu'il n'entravera pas l'action de la France à cet effet, sous réserve que cette action laissera intaets les droits dont, en vertu des Traités, Conventions, et usages, la Grande-Bretagne jouit au Maroc, y compris le droit de cabotage entre les ports Marocains dont bénéficient les navires Anglais depuis 1901.


ARTICLE III.

Le Gouvernement de Sa Majesté Britannique, de son côté, respectera les droits


p. 10

France, in virtue of Treaties, Conventions, and usage, enjoys in Egypt, including the right of coasting trade between Egyptian ports accorded to French vessels.

ARTICLE IV.

The two Governments, being equally attached to the principle of commercial liberty both in Egypt and Morocco, declare that they will not, in those countries, countenance any inequality either in the imposition of customs duties or other taxes, or of railway transport charges.

The trade of both nations with Morocco and with Egypt shall enjoy the same treatment in transit through the French and British possessions in Africa. An Agreement between the two Governments shall settle the conditions of such transit and shall determine the points of entry.

This mutual engagement shall be binding for a period of thirty years. Unless this stipulation is expressly denounced at least one year in advance, the period shall be extended for five years at a time.

Nevertheless, the Government of the French Republic reserve to themselves in Morocco, and His Britannic Majesty's Government reserve to themselves in Egypt, the right to see that the concessions for roads, railways, ports, &c., are only granted on such conditions as will maintain intact the authority of the State over these great undertakings of public interest.

ARTICLE V.

His Britannic Majesty's Government declare that they will use their influence in order that the French officials now in the Egyptian service may not be placed under conditions less advantageous than those applying to the British officials in the same service.

The Government of the French Republic, for their part, would make no objection to the application of analogous conditions to British officials now in the Moorish service.



ARTICLE VI.

In order to insure the free passage of the Suez Canal, His Britannic Majesty's Government declare that they adhere to the stipulations of the Treaty of the 29th October, 1888, and that they agree to their
dont, en vertu des Traités, Conventions, et usages, la France jouit en Égypte, y compris le droit de cabotage accolade aux navires Français entre les ports Égyptiens.

ARTICLE IV.

Les deux Gouvernements, également attachés au principe de la liberté cornmerciale tant en Égypte qu'au Maroc, déclarent qu'ils ne s'y prêteront à aucune inégalité, pas plus dans l'établissement des droits de douanes ou autres taxes que dans l'établissement des tarifs de transport par chemin de fer.

Le commerce de l'une et l'autre nation avec le Maroc et avec l'Égypte jouira du même traitement pour le transit par les possessions Françaises et Britanniques en Afrique. Un accord entre les deux Gouvernements réglera les conditions de ce transit et déterminera les points de pénétration.

Cet engagement réciproque est valable pour une période de trente ans. Faute de dénonciation expresso faite une année au moins à l'avance, cette période sera prolongée de cinq en cinq ans.

Toutefois, le Gouvernement de la République Française au Maroc et le Gouvernement de Sa Majesté Britannique en Égypte se réservent de veiller à ce que les concessions de routes, chemins de fer, ports, &c., soient données dans des conditions telles que l'autorité de l'État sur ces grandes entreprises d'intérêt général demeure entière.


ARTICLE V.

Le Gouvernement de Sa Majesté Britannique déclare qu'il usera de son influence pour que les fonctionnaires Français actuellement au service Égyptien ne soient pas mis dans des conditions moins avantageuses que celles appliquées aux fonctionnaires Anglais du même service.

Le Gouvernement de la République Française, de son côté, n'aurait pas d'objection à ce que des conditions analogues fussent consenties aux fonctionnaires Britanniques actuellement au service Marocain.

ARTICLE VI.

Afin d'assurer le libre passage du Canal de Suez, le Gouvernement de Sa Majesté Britannique déclare adhérer aux stipulations du Traité conclu le 29 Octobre, 1888, et à leur mise en vigueur. Le libre


p. 11

being put in force. The free passage of the Canal being thus guaranteed, the execution of the last sentence of paragraph 1 as well as of paragraph 2 of Article VIII of that Treaty will remain in abeyance.

ARTICLE VII.

In order to secure the free passage of the Straits of Gibraltar, the two Governments agree not to permit the erection of any fortifications or strategic works on that portion of the coast of Morocco comprised between, but not including, Melilla and the heights which command the right bank of the River Sebou.

This condition does not, however, apply to the places at present in the occupation of Spain on the Moorish coast of the Mediterranean.

ARTICLE VIII.

The two Governments, inspired by their feeling of sincere friendship for Spain, take into special consideration the interests which that country derives from her geographical position and from her territorial possessions on the Moorish coast of the Mediterranean. In regard to these interests the French Government will come to an understanding with the Spanish Government.

The agreement which may be come to on the subject between France and Spain shall be communicated to His Britannic Majesty's Government.

ARTICLE IX.

The two Governments agree to afford to one another their diplomatic support, in order to obtain the execution of the clauses of the present Declaration regarding Egypt and Morocco.

In, witness whereof his Excellency the Ambassador of the French Republic at the Court of His Majesty the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, Emperor of India, and His Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, duly authorized for that purpose, have signed the present Declaration and have affixed thereto their seals.

Done at London, in duplicate, the 8th day of April, 1904.

(L.S.)     LANSDOWNE.  
passage du Canal étant ainsi garanti, l'exécution de la dernière phrase du paragraphe 1 et celle du paragraphe 2 de l'Article VIII de ce Traité resteront suspendues.


ARTICLE VII.

Afin d'assurer le libre passage du Détroit de Gibraltar, les deux Gouvernements conviennent de ne pas laisser élever des fortifications ou des ouvrages stratégiques quelconques sur la partie de la côte Marocane comprise entre Melilla et les hauteurs qui dominent la rive droite du Sébou exclusivement.

Toutefois, cette disposition ne s'applique pas aux points actuellement occupés par l'Espagne sur la rive Marocaine de la Méditerranée.

ARTICLE VIII.

Les deux Gouvernements, s'inspirant de leurs sentiments sincèrement amicaux pour l'Espagne, prennent en particulière considération les intérêts qu'elle tient de sa position géographique et de ses possessions territoriales sur la côte Marocaine de la Méditerranée; et au sujet desquels le Gouvernement Français se concertera avec le Gouvernement Espagnol.

Communication sera faite au Gouvernement de Sa Majesté Britannique de l'accord qui pourra intervenir à ce sujet entre la France et l'Espagne.

ARTICLE IX.

Les deux Gouvernements conviennent de se prêter 1'appui de leur diplomatie pour 1'exécution des clauses de la présente Déclaration relative à l'Égypte et au Maroc.


En foi de quoi son Excellence l'Ambassadeur de la République Française près Sa Majesté le Roi du Royaume-Uni de la Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande et des Territoires Britanniques au delà des Mers, Empereur des Indes, et le Principal Secrétaire d'État pour les Affaires Étrangères de Sa Majesté Britannique, dûment autorisés à cet effet, ont signé la présente Déclaration et y ont apposé leurs cachets.

Fait à Londres, en double expédition, le 8 Avril, 1904.

(L.S.)   PAUL CAMBON.  




p. 12

Annex.

Projet de Décret

NOUS, Kédive d'Égypte,
Vu les Décrets mentionnés aux Annexes à la présente Loi;
Avec l'assentiment des Puissances signataires de la Convention de Londres;
Sur la proposition de notre Ministre des Finances et l'avis conforme de notre Conseil des Ministres,

Décrétons:

TITRE I.—DE LA DETTE PUBLIQUE.

1. Sont comprises dans la Dette Publique:—
La Dette Garantie
La Dette Privilégiée
La Dette Unifiée;
La Dette Domaniale;
La Dette Générale de la Daïra Sanieh
2. Toutes ces dettes sont représentées par des titres au porteur, munis de coupons semestriels.
3. Les coupons sont payables et les titres sont remboursables en or, sans aucune déduction.
4. Les paiements et remboursements ci-dessus sont effectués, pour ce qui concerne les Dettes Garantie, Privilégiée, et Unifiée, au Caire, à Londres, à Paris, et à Berlin.
Le change des paiements à Paris et à Berlin est fixé en monnaie Française et en monnaie Allemande, par la Commission de la Dette Publique, de concert avec le Ministre des Finances, sans que ce change puisse jamais dépasser la parité de la livre sterling, ni être inférieure à 25 fr., our 20 marks 25 pfennigs.
5. Pour ce qui concerne les Dettes Domaniale et Daïra Sanieh, les paiements et remboursements continueront à être effectués dans les mêmes villes et aux mêmes taux d'échange que jusqu'ici.
6. Il n'est pas admis d'opposition au paiement des coupons ou au remboursement des titres.
Toutefois, au cas où la déclaration de la perte ou du vol de titres ou de coupons leur paraîtrait suffisamment établie; les Administrations et banques chargées du service des emprunts auront la faculté de surseoir provisoirement au paiement des dits titres ou coupons.
7. L'intérêt annuel des obligations de la Dette Garantie est de 3 pour cent; il est payable semestriellement aux échéances du 1er Mars et du 1er Septembre.
Celui des obligations de la Dette Privilégiée est de 3½ pour cent, payable le 15 Avril et le 15 Octobre.
Celui des obligations de la Dette Unifiée est de 4 pour cent, payable le er Mai et le er Novembre.
Celui des obligations de la Dette Domaniale est de 4¼ pour cent, payable le er Juin et le er Décembre.
Celui des obligations de la Dette Daïra Sanieh est de 4 pour cent, payable le 15 Avril et le 15 Octobre.
8. Les obligations des dettes ci-dessus ne pourront être frappées d'aucun impôt au profit du Gouvernement Égyptien.
9. Les obligations de la Dette Garantie jouissent de la garantie resultant de la Convention Internationale en date du 18 Mars, 1885.
Les dites obligations, ainsi que celles des Dettes Privilégiée et Unifiée, sont, en outre, garanties de la manière résultant des Articles 30 à 43 de la présente Loi.
10. Les Emprunts Domanial et Daïra Sanieh continueront à être réglés par les dispositions des Conventions, Lois, et Décrets antérieurs, en that qu'elles ne sont pas expressément abrogées ou modifiées par la présente Loi. Les dispositions du Titre III de la présente Loi leur seront en outre applicables.



p. 13

TITRE II.—DES DETTES GARANTIE, PRIVILÉGIÉE, ET UNIFIÉE.

Composition de la Commission de la Dette Publique.

1. La Commission de la Dette Publique, instituée par Décret du 2 Mai, 1876, reste chargée du service des intérêts et de l'amortissement des Dettes Garantie, Privilégiée, et Unifiée, dans les conditions édictées par la présente Loi.
12. Cette Commission est permanente jusqu'à l'entier amortissement ou remboursement de ces dettes.
13. Elle est composée de six Commissaires étrangers: un Allemand, un Anglais, un Autrichien, un Français, un Italien, et un Russe.
14. Les Commissaires sont nommés, comme fonctionnaires Égyptiens, par Décret Khédivial, après avoir été indiqués par leurs Gouvernements respectifs, sur la demande du Gouvernement Égyptien, comme aptes à remplir leurs fonctions.
15. Ils ne pourront être relevés de leurs fonctions sans le consentement de leurs Gouvernements respectifs.
16. Ils ne peuvent accepter d'autres fonctions en Égypte.
17. Ils siégent au Caire.
18. Ils pourront confier à l'un d'eux les fonctions de Président, lequel en dounera avis au Ministre des Finances.


Attributions administratives de la Commission.

19. La Caisse de la Dette reçoit les fonds destinés au service des intérêts et de l'amortissement des Dettes Garantie, Privilégiée, et Unifiée, et fait l'emploi de ce fonds conformément aux dispositions de la presénte Loi.
20. La Commission de la Dette nomme et révoque les employés de la Caisse de la Dette.
21. Elle règle les raports entre la Caisse et ses correspondants.
22. Les dépenses de personnel et de matériel de la Caisse, les commissions et allocations diverses de ses correspondants, les frais de change, assurances, transports d'espèces, et généralement toutes dépenses nécessaires pour l'exécution des services des Dettes Garantie, Privilégiée, et Unifiée seront imputées sur les revenus affectés en vertu de l'Article 30, et feront annuellement l'objet d'un budget arrêté par la Commission de la Dette, lequel devra pour toute somme dépassant £ E. 35,000 être approuvé par le Conseil des Ministres.
23. Toutes sommes se trouvant entre les mains de la Commission de la Dette en exécution de la présente Loi pourront, jusqu'au jour de leur emploi, être placées en titres de la Dette Égyptienne.
      Elles pourront, en outre, être placées à intérêt de toute manière déterminée d'un accord commun par la Commission de la Dette et le Ministre des Finances.
24. En cas de placement en Égypte, contre dépôt de titres, les dispositions de la loi générale Égyptienne en matière de gage, tant au point de vue de la date certaine que de l'exécution, ne seront pas opposables à la Commission de la Dette en ce qui concerne les titres déposés.
En conséquence, dans tous les cas prévus dans les contrats de gage, la Commission de la Dette pourra procéder à la vente de tout ou partie des titres engagés, sans aucune formalité judiciaire ou extrajudiciaire et nonobstant toutes saisies, défenses ou oppositions de la part taut des propriétaires que des tiers.
25. Les bénéfices produits par les placements prévus à l'Article 23 s'ajouteront, faute de disposition contraire, aux fonds entre les mains de la Commission destinée au service des intérêts des dettes ci-dessus.
26. Sauf les dispositions des Articles précédents, la Commission de la Dette ne pourra employer aucun fonds, disponible ou non, en opérations de crédit, de commerce, d'industrie, ou autres.
27. La Caisse est dotée d'une somme de £ E. 1,800,000, pour servir comme fonds de réserve, et d'une somme de £ E. 500,000 à titre de fonds de roulement.
28. Les décisions de la Commission de la Dette sont prises à la majorité absolue des membres qui la composent.


p. 14

29. Annuellement, la Commission de la Dette publiera un Rapport sur ses opérations et soumettra son compte de gestion à l'autorité qui sera chargée de juger les comptes des Administrations Publiques.

Service et Granties des Dettes Garantie, Privilégiée, et Unifiée.

30. Le produit brut des impôts fonciers (non compris l'impôt sur les dattiers) dans toutes les provinces d'Égypte, à l'exception de Keneh, et sous réserve des dispositions de l'Article 63, est affecté au service des Dettes Garantie, Privilégiée, et Unifiée. Aussitôt que les sommes provenant de ce chef dans l'année seront suffisantes pour parfaire au service de la Dette, y compris les dépenses de la Caisse, tout excédent sera versé directement au Ministère des Finances. II est constateé qu'à la date du présent Décret les dits impôts produisent £ E. 4,200,000, et que le service de la Dette, y compris les dépenses de la Caisse, exige annuellement une somme d'environ £ E. 3,600,000.
31. A cet effet les comptables supérieurs de ces provinces sont tenus de verser à la Caisse de la Dette le produit brut des impôts fonciers jusqu'à, cue que les versements atteignent la somme nécessaire pour parfaire chaque année à l'annuité affectée au service de la Dette Garantie, ainsi qu'aux intérêts sur les Dettes Privilégiée et Unifiée et aux dépenses budgétaires de la Caisse, et jusqu'à ce que cette obligation soit remplie ils ne seront libérés que par les quittances de la Commission de la Dette.
32. Les dits comptables sont tenus de fournir directement à la Commission de la Dette des relevés mensuels faisant connaître:
Les droit constatés des échéances de l'impôt foncier de l'année courante et les arriérés dus sur les années antérieures;
Les recouvrements et les dégrèvements;
Les versements effectués à la Caisse de la Dette;
Les restes en caisse au dernier jour du mois.
33. Est affectée au service de la Dette Garantie une annuité fixe de £ E. 307,125 (315,0001.), qui sera prélevée comme première charge sur toutes les sommes affectées au service des Dettes Garantie, Privilégiée, et Unifiée.
La portion de cette annuité qui ne serait pas absorbée par le service de l'intérêt sera affectée à l'amortissement de la Dette Garantie.
34. Le service des intérêts de la Dette Privilégiée sera prélevé comme seconde charge sur les revenus affectés, et ensuite viendra comme troisième charge le service des intérêts de la Dette Unifiée.
35. En cas d'insuffisance des revenus affectés, la Commission de la Dette recourra, pour assurer le service des Dettes Garantie, Privilégiée, et Unifiée, au fonds de réserve, en observant les priorités ci-dessus et à charge de reconstituer entièrement ce fonds au moyen des premiers revenus reçus par elle qui resteraient disponibles.
Subsidiairement, le service des Dettes Garantie, Privilégiée, et Unifiée sera assuré par les ressources générales du Trésor.
36. Le Gouvernement ne pourra, sans l'assentiment des Puissances, apporter aux impôts fonciers dans les provinces mentionnées à l'Article 30 des modifications de nature à réduire leur rendement annuel au-dessous de £ E. 4,000,000.
37. Les Commissaries de la Dette auront, même individuellement, qualité pour poursuivre devant les Tribunaux Mixtes, comme représentants légaux des porteurs des titres, l'Administration Financière représentée par le Ministre des Finances, pour l'inexécution de toute obligation qui inconbe au Gouvernement en vertu de la présente Loi à l'égard de tout ce qui concerne le service des Dettes Garantie, Privilégiée, et Unifiée.

Amortissement et Remboursement.

38. Aucune partie des Dettes Garantie, Privilégiée, et Unifiée ne pourra être remboursée avant les dates indiquées à l'Article suivant, sous réserve, en ce qui concerne la Dette Garantie, des dispositions de l'Article 33.
39. A partir du 15 Juillet, 1910, le Gouvernement aura pleine liberté à rembourser au pair les Dettes Garantie et Privilégiée, soit à une même époque, soit à des époques différentes. II en sera de même pour la Dette Unifiée à partir du 15 Juillet, 1912.
40. A partir de la même date, il sera loisible au Gouvernement de verser à la Caisse de la Dette toute somme dont il pourrait disposer, pour être employée à l'amortissement de l'une quelconque de ces dettes.



p. 15

41. Tout amortissement prévu à l'Article 33 ou à l'Article 40, se fera par les soins de la Commission de la Dette.
Lorsque le cours du marché est au-dessous du pair, il se fera par rachats au cours du marché. Dans le cas contraire il s'effectuera au pair par voie de tirage.
42. Les tirages s'effectueront en séance publique; dans le cas d'amortissement en vertu de l'Article 40 avis en sera donné au “Journal Officiel” deux mois d'avance.
43. Le remboursement des titres sortant au tirage aura lieu à partir de 1'échéance du coupon suivant.



TITRE III.—DES DETTES DOMANIALE ET DAÏRA SANIEH.

Dette Domaniale.

44. Toute insuffisance des revenus des Domaines pour parfaire an service du coupon sera comblée par le Ministre des Finances dans les conditions prescrites par les Conventions passées entre le Gouvernement et MM. de Rothschild.
45. Seront employés à l'amortissement de la Dette Domaniale:
(a.) Le produit des ventes des propriétés des Domaines;
(b.) Les excédents des revenus nets des Domaines après paiement des coupons au taux actuel et des impôts fonciers dus au Gouvernement.
Aucun autre mode d'amortissement n'est admis.
46. Lorsque le cours du marché est au-dessous du pair, l'amortissement se fera par rachats au cours du marché. Dans le cas contraire il s'effectuera au pair par voie de tirage.
47. Sauf l'amortissement prévu à l'Article 45 la Dette Domaniale ne pourra être remboursée avant le 1er Janvier, 1915. A partir de cette date, elle sera remboursable au pair.
48. Les ventes des propriétés des Domaines pourront être consenties moitié au comptant, moitié par annuités portant intérêt à 4.25 pour cent, et dont le nombre ne pourra excéder quinze.
49. Les porteurs des anciennes obligations domaniales hypothécaires d'Égypte 5 pour cent seront déchus, quinze ans après la date de la promulgation du Décret du 25 Mars, 1893, relatif à la conversion de ces obligations, du droit de réclamer les sommes ou les titres nouveaux qui pourront leur avoir été dus par suite du remboursement ou de la conversion de leurs anciens titres.
Toute somme devenant disponible par suite de cette prescription sera considérée comme faisant partie des revenus annuels des Domaines; tout titre nouveau sera dans les mêmes conditions, annulé.


Dette Daïra Sanieh.

50. Les dispositions des Articles 45 et 46 seront applicables à la Dette Daïra Sanieh.
51. Sous réserve des dispositions ci-dessus relatives à l'amortissement, la Dette Daïra Sanieh ne pourra êitre remboursée avant le 15 Octobre, 1905. A partir de cette date elle sera remboursable au pair.



TITRE IV.—DISPOSITIONS DIVERSES.

Transfert du Fonds de Réserve et des Écconomies de Conversion, &c.

52. Les titres de la Dette Publique et les sommes en espèces actuellement déposés à la Caisse et répresentant le fonds de réserve constitué conformément au Décret du 12 Juillet, 1888, et les économies réalisées par suite des conversions des anciennes Dettes Privilégiée, Domaniale, et Daïra Sanieh, conformément au Décret du 6 Juin, 1890, sont entièrement libérés de leur affectation actuelle et seront versés au Ministère des Finances, déduction faite d'une somme suffisante pour parfaire au fonds de réserve et au fonds de roulement prévus à l'Article 27 du présent Décret.

p. 16

53. Seront également versés au Ministère des Finances tous les autres fonds actuellement entre les mains de la Commission de la Dette, sous réserve des dispositions de l'Article 56.
Dans l'application du présent Article et du précédent, les titres retenus par la Caisse de la Dette entreront en compte au pair.


Liquidation de 1880.

54. Toute condamnation judiciaire, résultant d'une réclamation contre le Gouvernement à raison de droits acquis antérieurement au 1er Janvier, 1880, constatés avant le ler Janvier, 1886, soit par une instance engagée devant les Tribunaux, soit par un accusé de réception émanant d'une Administration compétente, soit par un acte d'huissier, sera payée intégralement en espèces.
55. Le montant de ces condamnations sera prélevé, jusqu'à épuisement complet, sur la somme de 50,000l. actuellement en dépôt à la Caisse de la Dette en titres de la Dette Privilégiée et représentant le solde de l'actif de la liquidation de 1880. En cas d'insuffisance de cette somme, ces condamnations seront payées par le Gouvernement.
56. La somme de 50,0001. ci-dessus continuera en dépôt à la Caisse de la Dette pour satisfaire aux condamnations résultant des réclamations en suspens.
57. Le montant des coupons des titres qui le représentent s'ajouteront aux fonds entre les mains de la Commission de la Dette affectés au service des Dettes Garantie, Privilégiée, et Unifiée.
Trout excédent, après satisfaction des réclamations en suspens, sera versé au Ministère des Finances.


Moukabalah.

58. Sont maintenues, jusqu'au 30 juin, 1930, et suivant, la répartition déjà faite, les annuités, s'élevant à la somme de £ E. 150,000 par an, actuellement admises en diminution des impôts fonciers sur les terrains, à l'égard desquels la Moukabalah a été payée antérieurement, à l'année 1880.
59. Continueront à être tenus, à cet effet, les registres établis dans les villages, où sont consignés des comptes ouverts à chaque ayant droit, avec indication des annuités successives et désignation detaillée par lieux dits, contenances et quotes-parts d'impôts des terres auxquelles les annuités sont applicables.
60. Chaque année, les annuités seront inscrites sur les wirds ou extraits de rôles des contribuables en diminution de leurs impôts fonciers.
61. A chaque mutation de taklif, la portion des annuités correspondant à la portion des terres aliénées sera distraite, sur le registre, du compte de l'ancien propriétaire et reportée au compte du nouveau.
Il sera délivré au nouveau propriétaire, par les soins du Moudir, un certificat énonçant le montant des annuités pour lesquelles il se trouvera inscrit sur le registre du village.
Note en sera faite sur le certificat de l'ancien propriétaire ou ce certificat sera retiré, suivant le cas.
62. Lors de l'exécution du cadastre, l'évaluation des terres et la répartition de l'impôt seront faites sans tenir compte des annuités ci-dessus.
63. Les annuités prévues au présent chapitre seront considérées comme une réduction de l'impôt foncier aux fins des Articles 30, 31, et 36 de la présent Loi.


Prescriptions.

64. La prescription quinquenniale et la prescription de quinze ans établies par les Articles 275 et 272 du Code Civil et déclarées applicables aux Dettes Unifiée et Privilégiée par le Décret du 17 Juillet, 1880, continueront à êitre applicables, la première aux intérêts, des obligations des Dettes Garantie, Privilégiée, et Unifiée, la seconde aux capitaux des mêmes obligations désignées par le tirage pour l'amortissemeat.
Les délais de prescription seront calculés d'après le calendrie Grégorien.
Le montant des intérêts et capitaux atteints par la prescription s'ajoutera aux fonds entre les mains de la Commission de la Dette affectés au service des dettes ci-dessus.




p. 17

65. Les porteurs des titres des anciennes Dettes Privilégiée et Daïra Sanieh seront déchus, quinze ans après la date de la promulgation des Décrets du 7 Juin, 1890, on du 5 Juillet, 1890, suivant le cas, relatifs à la conversion de ces dettes, du droit de réclamer les sommes ou les titres nouveaux qui pourront leur avoir été dus par suite du remboursement ou de la conversion de leurs anciens titres.

Toute somme ainsi que tout titre devenant disponible par suite de ces prescriptions seront versés au Ministère des Finances.

Abrogations.

66. Sont et demeureront abrogés, sous réserve des dispositions du second alinéa du présent Article, les Décrets mentionnés à la première Annexe à la présente Loi, ainsi que les Articles de Décrets mentionnés à la seconde Annexe.

Néanmoins, aucune de ces abrogations n'aura pour effet:
      (1.) De faire renaître à l'encontre du Gouvernement aucune action qui avait été annulée par l'un des Décrets ci-dessus mentionnés ou qui, immédiatement avant l'entrée en vigueur de la présente Loi, serait prescrite ou périmée;
      (2.) De rendre aucune juridiction compétente pour connaître d'une reclamation dont, immédiatement avant l'entrée en vigueur de la présente Loi, elle était incompétente pour connaître.
      (3.) De remettre en vigueur aucune disposition antérieure de la Loi abrogée par l'un des dits Décrets;
      (4.) D'interrompre aucune prescription.

Entrée en vigueur et Exécution.

67. La présente Loi entrera en vigueur trente jours après sa promulgation au “Journal Officiel.”

68. Nos Ministres sont chargés, chacun en ce qui le concerne, de l'exécution de la présent Loi.



p. 18

Sub-Annex I.
Liste de Dérets abroges.

Date du Décret
Objet
Le 6 Avril, 1876 Suspension de paiement de bons et assignations.
Le 2 Mai, 1876 Instituant la Caisse de la Dette.
Le 7 Mai, 1876 Unification de la Dette.
Le 25 Mai, 1876 Règlement d'exécution du Décret du 7 Mai, 1876.
Le 18 Novembre, 1876 Conversion de la Dette.
Le 6 Décembre, 1876 Règlement d'exécution du Décret du 18 Novembre, 1876.
Le 15 Décembre, 1877 Modification des époques du service de la Dette Unifiée.
Le 30 Mars, 1879 Suspension du service de l'Emprunt 1864.
Le 22 Avril, 1879 Règlement des dettes du Gouvernement.
Le 25 Décembre, 1879 Composition du Conseil d'Administration des Chemins de Fer.
Le 3 Mars, 1880 Suspension de l'amortissement de l'Emprunt 1864.
Le 31 Mars, 1880 Instituant une Commission de Liquidation.
Le 26 Avril, 1880 Paiement à 4 pour cent du coupon du 1er Mai, 1880, de la Dette Unifiée.
Le 11 Mai, 1880 Suspension du service de l'Emprunt 1867.
Le 6 Juillet, 1880 Suspension du service de l'Emprunt 1865-66.
Le 12 Avril, 1885 Retenue de 5 pour cent sur les coupons de la Dette jusqu'au 1er Juin, 1885.
Le 27 Juillet, 1885 Emprunt Garanti.
Le 28 Juillet, 1885 Émission de l'Emprunt Garanti.
Le 22 Juin, 1886 Emploi des sommes provenant de l'Emprunt Garanti.
Le 22 Juin, 1886 Irrecevabilité de l'opposition au paiement des coupons et au remboursement des titres de la dette.
Le 12 Avril, 1887 Paiement des coupons des Dettes Privilégiée et Unifiée à Berlin en or.
Le 14 Juillet, 1887 Autorisant les Commissaires de la Dette à fixer le change des paiements de la Dette à Paris et à Berlin.
Le 26 Janvier, 1888 Augmentation des dépenses administratives.
Le 2 Avril, 1888 Augmentation des dépenses administratives pour le service de la Corvée.
Le 30 Avril, 1888 Emprunt de £ E. 2,000,000.
Le 12 Juillet, 1888 Constitution d'un fonds de réserve de £ E. 2,000,000.
Le 14 Juin, 1889 Augmentation des dépenses administratives pour le service de la Corvée.
Le 19 Décembre, 1889 Suppression de la Corvée.
Le 2 Juin, 1890 Modification de la date à laquelle sera arrêté le compte des excédents des Revenus Affectés.
Le 6 Juin, 1890 Conversion des Dettes Privilégiée, Domaniale, et Daïra Sanieh.
Le 7 Juin, 1890 Exécution de la conversion de la Dette Privilégiée.
Le 5 Juillet, 1890 Exécution de la conversion de la Dette de la Daïra Sanieh.


p. 19


Date du Décret
Objet
Le 8 Novembre, 1890 Dates dn remboursement des Dette Privilégiée et Daïra Senieh.
Le 13 Janvier, 1891 Clôture des opérations de la conversion de la Dette Privilégiée.
Le 8 Décembre, 1891 Augmentation des dépenses administratives pour l'assainissement de la ville du Caire.
Le 18 Mars, 1893 Fixant à 4¼ pour cent le taux de la nouvelle Dette Domaniale.
Le 25 Mars, 1893 Exécution de la conversion de la Dette Domaniale
Le 29 Mai, 1893 Date du remboursement de la Dette Domaniale.
Le 10 Février, 1894 Prélèvement annuel de £ E. 5,000 sur le droit d'abatage.
Le 10 Décembre, 1894 Affectation du droit dc bacs sur les canaux.
Le 15 Mai, 1895 Modification de l'Article 35 du Décret du 17, Juillet, 1880. Budget de la Commission de la Dette.
Le 26 Novembre, 1898 Réduction de l'impôt foncier.
Le 13 Novembre, 1899 Procédure pour les décisions de la Caisse de la Dette.
Le 20 Janvier, 1900 Emploi des économies—remboursement et amortissement de la Dette Domaniale.
Le 12 Juillet, 1900 Emprunt de £ E. 1,700,000
Le 21 Mai, 1902 Augmentation du budget des dépenses des chemins de fer.


Sub-Annex II.

Liste de Dérets abrogés en partie.

Date du Décret
Objet
Partie abrogée
Le 6 Janvier, 1880 Portant abrogation de la Moukabalah Les Articles 3, 4.
Le 17 Juillet, 1880 Loi de Liquidation Les Articles 1-39, 63-98.
Le 8 Mars, 1891 Loi sur les Patentes L'Article 1, 2o, les Articles 2-29.
Le 26 Décembre, 1891 Rattachant au Gouvernorat d'Alexandrie le service des Contributions L'Article 4.
Le 28 Janvier, 1892 Portant suppression de la corvée, &c. Les Articles 2, 3, 4, 6, 7.
Le 25 Décembre, 1894 Portant prélèvement annuel de £ E. 40,000 sur les droits de phare, &c. L'Article 7.





p. 20

Inclosure 2.

Convention signed at London, April 8, 1904.


HIS Majesty the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, Emperor of India, and the President of the French Republic, having resolved to put an end, by a friendly Arrangement, to the difficulties which have arisen in Newfoundland, have decided to conclude a Convention to that effect, and have named as their respective Plenipotentiaries:

His Majesty the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain. and Ireland and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, Emperor of India, the Most Honourable Henry Charles Keith Petty-Fitzmaurice, Marquess of Lansdowne, His Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs; and

The President of the French Republic, his Excellency Monsieur Paul Cambon, Ambassador of the French Republic at the Court of His Majesty the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, Emperor of India;

Who, after having communicated to each other their full powers, found in good and due form, have agreed as follows, subject to the approval of their respective Parliaments:—

ARTICLE I.

France renounces the privileges established to her advantage by Article XIII of the Treaty of Utrecht, and confirmed or modified by subsequent provisions.

ARTICLE II.

France retains for her citizens, on a footing of equality with British subjects, the right of fishing in the territorial waters on that portion of the coast of Newfoundland comprised between Cape St. John and Cape Ray, passing by the north; this right shall be exercised during the usual fishing season closing for all persons on the 20th October of each year.

SA Majesté le Roi du Royaume-Uni de la Grande-Bretagne et d'Iriande et des Territoires Britanniques au delà des Mers, Empereur des Indies, et le President de la Republique Française, ayant résolu de mettre fin, par un arrangement amiable, aux difficultés survenues à Terre-Neuve, ont décidé de conclure une Convention à cet effet, et ont nommé pour leurs Plénipotentiaires respectifs:

Sa Majesté le Roi du Royaume-Uni de la Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande et des Territoires Britanniques au delà des Mers, Empereur des Lades, le Très Honorable Henry Charles Keith Petty-Fitzmaurice, Marquis de Lansdowne, Principal Secrétaire d'État de Sa Majesté au Département des Affaires Étrangères; et

Le Président de la République Française, son Excellence Monsieur Paul Cambon, Ambassadeur de la Republique Française près Sa Majesté le Roi du Royaume-Uni de la Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande et des Territoires Britanniques au delà des Mers, Empereur des Indes;

Lesquels, après s'être communiqué leurs pleins pouvoirs, trouvés en bonne et due forme, sont convenus de ce qui suit, sous reserve de l'approbation de leurs Parlements respectifs:—

ARTICLE I.

La France renonce aux privilèges établis à son profit par l'Article XIII du Traité d'Utrecht, et confirmés ou modifiés par des dispositions postérieures.


ARTICLE II.

La France conserve pour ses ressortissants, sur le pied d'égalité avec les sujets Britanniques, le droit de pêche dans les eaux territoriales sur la partie de la côte de Terre-Neuve comprise entre le Cap Saint-Jean et le Cap Raye en passant par le nord; ce droit s'exercera pendant la saison habituelle de pêche finissant pour tout le monde le 20 Octobre de chaque année.


p. 21

The French may therefore fish there for every kind of fish, including bait and also shell fish. They may enter any port or harbour on the said coast and may there obtain supplies or bait and shelter on the same conditions as the inhabitants of Newfoundland, but they will remain subject to the local Regulations in force; they may also fish at the mouths of the rivers, but without going beyond a straight line drawn between the two extremities of the banks, where the river enters the sea.

They shall not make use of stake-nets or fixed engines without permission of the local authorities.

On the above-mentioned portion of the coast, British subjects and French citizens shall be subject alike to the laws and Regulations now in force, or which may hereafter be passed for the establishment of a close time in regard to any particular kind of fish, or for the improvement of the fisheries. Notice of any fresh laws or Regulations shall be given to the Government of the French Republic three months before they come into operation.

The policing of the fishing on the above-mentioned portion of the coast, and for prevention of illicit liquor traffic and smuggling of spirits, shall form the subject of Regulations drawn up in agreement by the two Governments.



ARTICLE III.

A pecuniary indemnity shall be awarded by His Britannic Majesty's Government to the French citizens engaged in fishing or the preparation of fish on the "Treaty Shore," who are obliged, either to abandon the establishments they possess there, or to give up their occupation, in consequence of the modification introduced by the present Convention into the existing state of affairs.

This indemnity cannot be claimed by the parties interested unless they have been engaged in their business prior to the closing of the fishing season of 1903.

Claims for indemnity shall be submitted to an Arbitral Tribunal composed of an officer of each nation, and, in the event of disagreement, of an umpire appointed in accordance with the procedure laid down by Article XXXII of The Hauge Convention. The details regulating the constitution of the Tribunal and the conditions of the inquiries to be instituted for the
Les Français pourront done y pêcher toute espèce de poisson, y compris la boëtte, ainsi que les crustacés. Ils pourront entrer dans tout port ou havre de cette côte et s'y procurer des approvisionnements ou de la boëtte et s'y abriter dans les mêmes conditions que les habitants de Terre-Neuve, en restant soumis aux Règlements locaux en vigueur; ils pourront aussi pêcher à l'embouchure des rivières, sans toutefois pouvoir dépasser une ligne droite qui serait tirée de l'un à l'autre des points extrêmes du rivage entre lesquels la rivière se jette dans la mer.

Ils devront s'abstenir de faire usage d'engins de pêche fixes ("stake-nets and fixed engines") sans la permission des autorités locales.

Sur la partie de la côte mentionnée ci-dessus, les Anglais et les Français seront soumis sur le pied d'égalité aux Lois et Règlements actuellement en vigueur ou qui seraient édictés, dans la suite, pour la prohibition, pendant un temps déterminé, de la pêche de certains poissons ou pour l'amélioration des pêcheries. Il sera donne connaissance au Gouvernement de la République Française des Lois et Règlements nouveaux, trois mois avant l'époque ou ceux-ci devront être appliqués.

La police de la pêche sur la partie de la côte susmentionnée, ainsi que celle du trafic illicite des liqueurs et de la contrebande des alcools, feront l'objet d'un Règlement établi d'accord entre les deux Gouvernements.

ARTICLE III.

Une indemnité pécuniair sera allouée par le Gouvernement de Sa Majesté Britannique aux citoyens Français se livrant à la pêche ou à la préparation du Poisson sur le "Treaty Shore," qui seront obligés soit d'abandonner les établissements qu'ils y possèdent, soit de renoncer à leur industrie, par suite de la modification apportée par la présente Convention à l'état de choses actuel.

Cette indemnité ne pourra être réclamée par les intéressés que s'ils ont exercé leur profession antérieurement à la clôture de la saison de pêche de 1903.

Les demandes d'indemnité seront soumises à un Tribunal Arbitral composé d'un officier de chaque nation, et en cas de désaccord d'un sur-arbitre désigné suivant la procedure instituée par l'Article XXXII de la Convention de La Haye. Les details réglant la constitution du Tribunal et les conditions des enquêtes à ouvrir pour mettre les demandes en état



p. 22

purpose of substantiating the claims, shall form the subject of a special Agreement between the two Governments.



ARTICLE IV.

His Britannic Majesty's Government, recognizing that, in addition to the indemnity referred to in the preceding Article, some territorial compensation is due to France in return for the surrender of her privilege in that part of the Island of Newfoundland referred to in Article II, agree with the Government of the French Republic to the provisions embodied in the following Articles:—


ARTICLE V.

The present frontier between Senegambia and the English Colony of the Gambia shall be modified so as to give to France Yarbutenda and the lands and landing places belonging to that locality.

In the event of the river not being open to maritime navigation up to that point, access shall be assured to the French Government at a point lower down on the River Gambia, which shall be recognized by mutual agreement as being accessible to merchant ships engaged in maritime navigation.

The conditions which shall govern transit on the River Gambia and its tributaries, as well as the method of access to the point that may be reserved to France in accordance with the preceding paragraph, shall form the subject of future agreement between the two Governments.

In any case, it is understood that these conditions shall be at least as favourable as those of the system instituted by application of the General Act of the African Conference of the 26th February, 1885, and of the Anglo-French Convention of the 14th June, 1898, to the English portion of the basin of the Niger.


ARTICLE VI.

The group known as the Iles de Los, and situated opposit Konakry, is ceded by His Britantic Majesty to France.


ARTICLE VII.

Persons born in the territories ceded to France by Articles V and VI of the




feront l'object d'un Arrangement spécial entre les deux Gouvernements.



ARTICLE IV.

Le Gouvernement de Sa Majesté Britannique, reconnaissant qu'en outre de l'indemnité mentionnée dans l'Article précédent, une compensation territorial est due à la France pour l'abandon de son privilège sur la partie de l'Ile de Terre-Neuve visée à l'Article II, convient avec le Gouvernement de la République Française des dispositions qui font l'objet des Articles suivants:—


ARTICLE V.

La frontière existant entre la Sénégambie et la Colonie Anglaise de la Gambie sera modifiée de manière à assurer à la France la possession de Yarboutenda et des terrains et points d'atterrissement appartenant à cette localité. Au cas où la navigation maritime ne pourrait s'exercer jusque-là, un accès sera assuré en aval au Gouvernement Français sur un point de la Rivière Gambie qui sera reconnu d'un commun accord comme étant accessible aux bâtiments marchands se livrant à la navigation maritime.

Les conditions dans lesquelles seront réglés le transit sur la Rivière Gambie et ses affluents, ainsi que le mode d'accès au point qui viendrait à être réservé à la France, en exécution du paragraphe précédent, feront l'objet d'arrangements à concerter entre les deux Gouvernements.

Il est, dans tour les cas, entendu que ces conditions seront au moins aussi favorables que celles du régime institué par application de l'Acte Général de la Conférence Africaine du 26 Février, 1885, et de la Convention Franco-Anglaise du 14 Juin, 1898, dans la partie Anglaise du bassin du Niger.

Le Gouvernement de la République Française, de son côté, n'aurait pas d'objection à ce que des conditions analogues fussent consenties aux fonctionnaires Britanniques actuellement au service Marocain.


ARTICLE VI.

Le groupe désigné sous le nom d'Iles de Los, et situé en face de Konakry, est cédé par Sa Majesté Britannique à la France.


ARTICLE VII.

Les personnes nées sur les territories cédés à la France par les Articles V et VI.


p. 23

present Convention may retain British nationality by means of an individual declaration to that effect, to be made before the proper authorities by themselves, or, in the case of children under age, by their parents or guardians.

The period within which, the declaration of option referred to in the preceding paragraph must be made, shall be one year, dating from the day on which French authority shall be established over the territory in which the persons in question have been born.

Native laws and customs now existing will, as far as possible, remain undisturbed.

In the Iles de Los, for a period of thirty years from the date of exchange of the ratifications of the present Convention, British fishermen shall enjoy the same rights as French fishermen with regard to anchorage in all weathers, to taking in provisions and water, to making repairs, to transhipment of goods, to the sale of fish, and to the landing and drying of nets, provided always that they observe the conditions laid down in the French Laws and Regulations which may be in force there.



ARTICLE VIII.

To the east of the Niger the following line shall be substituted for the boundary fixed between the French and British possessions by the Convention of the 14th June, 1898, subject to the modifications which may result from the stipulations introduced in the final paragraph of the present Article.

Starting from the point on the left bank of the Niger laid down in Article IlI of the Convention of the 14th June, 1898, that is to say, the median line of the Dallul Mauri, the frontier shall be drawn along this median line until it meets the circumference of a circle drawn from the town of Sokoto as a centre, with a radius of 160,932 mètres (100 miles). Thence it shall follow the northern arc of this circle to a point situated 5 kilomètres south of the point of intersection of the above-mentioned arc of the circle with the route from Dosso to Matankari viâ Maourédé.

Thence it shall be drawn in a direct line to a point 20 kilomètres north of Konni (Birni-N'Kouni), and then in a direct line to a point 15 kilomètres south of Maradi, and thence shall be continued in a direct line to the point of intersection of the parallel of 13° 20' north latitude with a meridian passing 70 miles to the east of the second intersection of the 14th

de la présence Convention pourront conserver la nationalité Britannique moyennant une déclaration individuelle faite à cet effet devant l'autorité compétente par elles-mêmes, ou, dans le cas d'enfants mineurs, par leurs parents ou tuteurs.

Le délai dans lequel devra se faire la declaration d'option prévue au paragraphe précédent sera d'un an à dater du jour de l'installation de l'autorité Française sur le territoire où seront nées les dites personnes.

Les lois et coutumes indigènes actuellement en vigueur seront respectées autant que possible.

Aux Iles de Los, et pendant une période de trente années à partir de l'échange des ratifications de la présente Convention, les pêcheurs Anglais bénéficieront en ce qui concerne le droit d'ancrage par tous les temps, d'approvisionnement et d'aiguade, de réparation, de transbordement de marchandises, de vente de poisson, de descente à terre et de séchage des filets, du même régime que les pêcheurs Français, sous réserve, toutefois, par eux de l'observation des prescriptions édictées dans les Lois et Règlements Français qui y seront en vigueur.


ARTICLE VIII.

A l'est du Niger, et sous réserve des modifications que pourront y comporter les stipulations insérées au dernier paragraphe du présent Article, le tracé suivant sera substitué à la délimitation établie entre les possessions Françaises et Anglaises par la Convention du 14 Juin, 1898:—

Partant du point sur la rive gauche du Niger indiqué à l'Article III de la Convention du 14 Juin, 1898, c'est-à-dire, la ligne médiane du Dallul-Maouri, la frontière suivra cette ligne médiane jusqu'à sa rencontre avec la circonférence d'un cercle décrit du centre de la ville de Sokoto avec un rayon de 160,932 mètres (100 milles). De ce point, elle suivra l'arc septentrional de ce cercle jusqu'à un point situé à 5 kilomètres au sud du point d'intersection avec le dit arc de cercle de la route de Dosso à Matankari par Maourédé.

Elle gagnera de là, en ligne droite, un point situé à 20 kilomètres au nord de Konni (Birni-N'Kouni), puis de là, également en ligne droite, un point situé à 15 kilomètres au sud de Maradi, et rejoindra ensuite directement l'intersection du parallèle 13° 20' de latitude nord avec un méridien passant à 70 milles à l'est de la seconde intersection du 14e degré de



p. 24

degree of north latitude and the northern arc of the above-mentioned circle.

Thence the frontier shall follow in an easterly direction the parallel of 13° 20' north latitude until it strikes the left bank of the River Komadugu Waubé (Komadougou Ouobé), the thalweg of which it will then follow to Lake Chad. But, if before meeting this river the frontier attains a distance of 5 kilomètres from the caravan route from Zinder to Yo, through Sua Kololua (Soua Kololoua), Adeber, and Kabi, the boundary shall then be traced at a distance of 5 kilomètres to the south of this route until it strikes the left bank of the River Komadugu Waubé (Komadougou Ouobé), it being nevertheless understood that, if the boundary thus drawn should happen to pass through a village, this village, with its lands, shall be assigned to the Government to which would fall the larger portion of the village and its lands. The boundary will then, as before, follow the thalweg of the said river to Lake Chad.

Thence it will follow the degree of latitude passing through the thalweg of the mouth of the said river up to its intersection with the meridian running 35' east of the centre of the town of Kouka, and will then follow this meridian southwards until it intersects the southern shore of Lake Chad.

It is agreed, however, that, when the Commissioners of the two Governments at present engaged in delimiting the line laid down in Article IV of the Convention of the 14th June, 1898, return home and can be consulted, the two Governments will be prepared to consider any modifications of the above frontier line which may seem desirable for the purpose of determining the line of demarcation with greater accuracy. In order to avoid the inconvenience to either party which might result from the adoption of a line deviating from recognized and well-established frontiers, it is agreed that in those portions of the projected line where the frontier is not determined by the trade routes, regard shall be had to the present political divisions of the territories so that the tribes belonging to the territories of Tessaoua-Maradi and Zinder shall, as far as possible, be left to France, and those belonging to the territories of the British zone shall, as far as possible, be left to Great Britain.

It is further agreed that, on Lake Chad, the frontier line shall, if necessary, be modified so as to assure to France a communication through open water at all seasons between her possessions on the north-west and those on the south-east of

latitude nord avec Pare septentrional du cercle précité.


De là, la frontière suivra, vers l'est, le parallèle 13° 20' de latitude nord jusqu'à sa rencontre avec la rive gauche de la Rivière Komadougou Ouobé (Komadugu Waube), dont elle suivra le thalweg jusqu'au Lac Tchad. Mais si, avant de rencontrer cette rivière, la frontière arrive à une distance de 5 kilomètres de la route de caravane de Zinder à Yo, par Soua Kololoua (Sua Kololua), Adeber, et Kabi, la frontière sera tracée à une distance de 5 kilomètres au sud de cette route jusqu'à sa rencontre avec la rive gauche de la Rivière Komadougou Ouobé (Komadugu Waube), étant toutefois entendu que si la frontière ainsi tracée venait à traverser un village, ce village, avec ses terrains, serait attribué au Gouvernement auquel se rattacherait la partie majeure du village et de ses terrains. Elle suivra ensuite, comme ci-dessus, le thalweg de la dite rivière jusqu'au Lac Tchad.

De là elle suivra le degré de latitude passant par le thalweg de l'embouchure de la dite rivière jusqu'à son intersection avec le méridien passant à 35' est du centre de la Ville de Kouka, puis ce méridien vers le sud jusqu'à son intersection avec la rive sud du Lac Tchad.

Il est convenu, cependant, que lorsque les Commissaires des deux Gouvernements qui procèdent en ce moment à la délimitation de la ligne établie clans l'Article IV de la Convention du 14 Juin, 1898, seront revenus et pourront être consultés, les deux Gouvernements prendront en considération toute modification à la lignefrontière ci-dessus qui semblerait désirable pour déterminer la ligne de démarcation avec plus de précision. Afin d'éviter les inconvénients qui pourraient résulter de part et d'autre d'un tracé qui s'écarterait des frontières reconnues et bien constatées, il est convenu que, dans la partie du tracé où la frontière n'est pas déterminée par les routes commerciales, il sera tenu compte des divisions politiques actuelles des territoires, de façon à ce que les tribes relevant des territoires de Tessaoua-Maradi et Zinder soient, autant que possible, laissées à la France, et celles relevant des territoires de la zone Anglaise soient, autant que possible, laissées à la Grande-Bretagne. Il est en outre entendu que, sur le Tchad, la limite sera, s'il est besoin, modifiée de façou à assurer à la France une communication en eau libre en toute saison entre ses possessions du nord-ouest et du sud-est du Lac, et une partie de la





p. 25

the Lake, and a portion of the surface of the open waters of the Lake at least proportionate to that assigned to her by the map forming Annex 2 of the Convention of the 14th June, 1898.

In that portion of the River Komadugu which is common to both parties, the populations on the banks shall have equal rights of fishing.



ARTICLE IX.

The present Convention shall be ratified, and the ratifications shall be exchanged, at London, within eight months, or earlier if possible.

In witness whereof his Excellency the Ambassador of the French Republic at the Court of His Majesty the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, Emperor of India, and His Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, duly authorized for that purpose, have signed the present Convention and have affixed thereto their seals.

Done at London, in duplicate, the 8th day of April, 1904.

(L.S.)     LANSDOWNE.  
superficie des eaux libres du Lac au moins proportionnelle à celle qui lui était attribuée par la carte formant l'Annexe No. 2 de la Convention du 14 Juin, 1898.

Dans la partie commune de la Rivière Komadougou, les populations riveraines auront égalité de droits pour la pêche.


ARTICLE IX.

La présente Convention sera ratifiée, et les ratifications en seront échangées, à Londres, dans le délai de huit mois, ou plus tôt si faire se peut.

En foi de quoi son Excellence l'Ambassadeur de la Republique Française près Sa Majesté le Roi du Royaume-Uni de la Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande et des Territoires Britanniques au delà des Mers, Empereur des Indes, et le Principal Secrétaire d'État pour les Affaires Étrangères de Sa Majesté Britannique, dûment autorisés à cet effet, ont signé la présente Convention et y ont apposé leurs cachets.

Fait à Londres, en double expédition, le 8 Avril, 1904.

(L.S.)   PAUL CAMBON.  





p. 26

Inclosure 3.

Declaration concerning Siam, Madagascar, and the New Hebrides


I.—Siam

THE Government of His Britannic Majesty and the Government of the French Republic confirm Articles 1 and 2 of the Declaration signed in London on the 15th January, 1896, by the Marquess of Salisbury, then Her Britannic Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, and Baron de Courcel, then Ambassador of the French Republic at the Court of Her Britannic Majesty.

In order, however, to complete these arrangements, they declare by mutual agreement that the influence of Great Britain shall be recognized by France in the territories situated to the west of the basin of the River Menam, and that the influence of France shall be recognized by Great Britain in the territories situated to the east of the same region, all the Siamese possessions on the east and south-east of the zone above described and the adjacent islands coming thus henceforth under French influence, and, on the other hand, all Siamese possessions on the west of this zone and of the Gulf of Siam, including the Malay Peninsula and the adjacent islands, coming under English influence.

The two Contracting Parties, disclaiming all idea of annexing any Siamese territory, and determined to abstain from any act which might contravene the provisions of existing Treaties, agree that, with this reservation, and so far as either of them is concerned, the two Governments shall each have respectively liberty of action in their spheres of influence as above defined.


II.—Madagascar

In view of the Agreement now in negotiation on the questions of jurisdiction and the postal service in Zanzibar, and on the adjacent coast, His Britannic Majesty's Government withdraw the protest which

Déclaration concernant le Siam, Madagascar, et les Nouvelles-Hébrides.


I.—Siam

LE Gouvernement de Sa Majesté Britannique et le Gouvernement de la République Française maintiennent les Articles 1 et 2 de la Déclaration signée à Londres le 15 Janvier, 1896, par le Marquis de Salisbury, Principal Secrétaire d'État pour les Affaires Étrangères de Sa Majesté Britannique à cette époque, et le Baron de Courcel, Ambassadeur de la Republique Française près Sa Majesté Britannique à cette époque.

Toutefois, en vue de compléter ces dispositions, ils déclarent d'un commun accord que l'influence de la Grande-Bretagne sera reconnue par la France sur les territoires situés à l'ouest du bassin de la Meinam, et celle de la France sera reconnue par la Grande-Bretagne sur les territoires situés à l'est de la même région, toutes les possessions Siamoises à l'est et au sud-est de la zone susvisée et les îles adjacentes relevant ainsi désormais de 1'influence Française et, d'autre part, toutes les possessions Siamoises à l'ouest de cette zone et du Golfe de Siam, y compris la Péninsule Malaise et les îles adjacentes, relevant de l'influence Anglaise.

Les deux Parties Contractantes, écartant d'ailleurs toute idée d'annexion d'aucun territoire Siamois, et résolues à s'abstenir de tout acte qui irait à l'encontre des dispositions des Traités existants, conviennent que, sous cette réserve et en regard de l'un et de l'autre, l'action respective des deux Gouvernements s'exercera librement sur chacune des deux sphères d'influence ainsi définies.



II.—Madagascar

En vue de l'Accord en préparation sur les questions de juridiction et du service postal à Zanzibar, et sur la côte adjacente, le Gouvernement de Sa Majesté Britannique renonce à la réclamation qu'il avait




p. 27

they had raised against the introduction of the Customs Tariff established at Madagascar after the annexation of that island to France. The Government of the French Republic take note of this Declaration.


III.—NEW HEBRIDES

The two Governments agree to draw up in concert an Arrangement which, without involving any modification of the political status quo, shall put an end to the difficulties arising from the absence of jurisdiction over the natives of the New Hebrides.

They agree to appoint a Commission to settle the disputes of their respective nationals in the said islands with regard to landed property. The competency of this Commission and its rules of procedure shall form the subject of a preliminary Agreement between the two Governments.

In witness whereof His Britannic Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs and his Excellency the Ambassador of the French Republic at the Court of His Majesty the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, Emperor of India, duly authorized for that purpose, have signed the present Declaration and have affixed thereto their seals.

Done at London, in duplicate, the 8th day of April, 1904.

(L.S.)     LANSDOWNE.  
formulée contre l'introduction du Tarif Douanier établi à Madagascar après l'annexion de cette île à la France. Le Gouvernement de la République Française prend acte de cette Déclaration.


III.—NOUVELLES-HÉBRIDES

Les deux Gouvernements conviennent de préparer de concert un Arrangement qui, sans impliquer aucune modification dans le statu quo politique, mette fin aux difficultés resultant de l'absence de juridiction sur les indigènes des Nouvelles-Hébrides.

Ils conviennent de nommer une Commission pour le règlement des différends fonciers de leurs ressortissants respectifs dans les dites îles. La compétence de cette Commission et les règles de sa procédure feront l'objet d'un Accord préliminaire entre les deux Gouvernements.

En foi de quoi le Principal Secrétaire d'État pour les Affaires Étrangères de Sa Majesté Britannique et son Excellence l'Ambassadeur de la République Française près Sa Majesté le Roi du Royaume-Uni de la Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande et des Territoires Britanniques au delà des Mers, Empereur des Indes, dûment autorisés à cet effet, ont signé la présente Déclaration, et y ont apposé leurs cachets.

Fait à Londres, en double expédition, le 8 Avril, 1904.

(L.S.)   PAUL CAMBON.  




FRANCE. No. 1 (1904).



DESPATCH to His Majesty's Ambassador at Paris forwarding
Agreements between Great Britain and France of April 8, 1904.



Presented to both Houses of Parliament by Command of His Majesty. April 1904.



LONDON:
PRINTED BY HARRISON AND SONS