Matching Articles"Settlement" (Total 59)

  • A histroy about the communities Broomclose and Sailors Island, located on the Eastport Peninsula of Newfoundland.
  • Information about the definition of a city as well as information about St. John's, Mount Pearl, and Corner Brook.
  • Information about the definition of a city as well as information about St. John's, Mount Pearl, and Corner Brook.
  • The settlement of Eastport, Happy Adventure and Sandy Cove was essentially a single phased operation from the 1850s into the 1870s.
  • The origins of Communities in the Eastport Peninsula, such as Salvage, Eastport, Sandy Cove, Happy Adventure, etc.
  • A community is a group of people who live in the same area and share the same culture. This article is all about the function of communities.
  • Information about the communities of Burnside and St. Chad's on the Eastport Peninsula of Newfoundland.
  • The Neck, a parcel of land used for inter-community and peninsular activities, is located between Eastport, Happy Adventure, and Sandy Cove.
  • About the English and Irish origins of Newfoundlanders and Labradorians that immigrated between the 17th and 19th century.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador is often described as having the most homogeneous population of European origin in Canada.
  • A permanent population in the Salvage-Barrow Harbour area from the 1780s up to the 1820s was created by families who came to fish for cod.
  • Families of Salvage were very closely intertwined through marriage and migration with those in nearby places.
  • Settled in the 1820s, Flat Islands (a collective name for a cluster of four flat-topped island settlements) grew very rapidly
  • French migrations to Newfoundland and Labrador began in the early 16th century and lasted for approximately 400 years.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador's cod fishery was the major pull factor attracting French settlers to the colony from the 16th through 19th centuries.
  • During the 19th century, migrants often moved to new areas of the country to supprot themselves and their families.
  • Irish migrations began in the late-17th century and peaked in the early 19th century, when up to 35,000 Irish arrived on the island.
  • The Irish migrations to Newfoundland, and the associated provisions trade, represent the oldest connections between Ireland and Canada.
  • The cod fishery and its mercantile activities greatly influenced Irish settlement patterns in Newfoundland and Labrador.