p. 4153
N


No. 1587.

EXTRACT FROM LETTER TO JOHN SHEPHERD, ESQ., SECRETARY, HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY,
LONDON, FROM G. SIMPSON.


Confidential.
Lachine, 15 Novr., 1856.

*****
7. With reference to your enquiry respecting the boundaries of the Company's territory on the Canada side, and the nature of the intervening country, an attempt is now being made to deprive the Company of a part of their territory on the ground that it was in the possession of the French, and formed part of Canada, at the time the Company's charter was granted, from which are specially reserved all lands in the actual occupation of any Christian Prince. It would be very difficult to make this claim good, or to skew that the Company's territory was ever known to the French, but it serves to indicate the anxiety to found a claim as a basis of operations. The boundary between Ruperts Land and Canada, that as we have always understood it, is the range of hills or height of land, that divides the waters flowing into Hudson's Bay from those which find their outlet by the St. Lawrence. The most easterly extremity of that dividing ridge is near Cape Chudleigh at the entrance of Hudson's Straits from whence it runs southerly through Labrador, the rivers flowing from one side into the Atlantic and from the other into Ungava Bay and Eastmain. It then takes a westerly course parallel with, but from 200-300 miles north of the St. Lawrence and its main tributary the Ottawa, near Temiscamigue when it approaches Lake Hudson, and then runs round Lake Superior into United States territory, where it is unnecessary to follow it. All the rivers which take their rise on the North side of the line of hills above traced flow into Hudson's Bay and we claim that the lands lying along all those rivers up to their very sources, are embraced in the Company's Charter.
*****

[1927lab]


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