p. 3234
C

No. 1247.

GENERAL MURRAY TO WILLIAM PITT, 1 JANUARY, 1761 (?).

ARCHIVES OF CANADA.
LETTER-BOOK OF GEN. JAMES MURRAY, 1759-89, pp. 60-61, Vol. III.

Mr Pitt

Sir :
By the Mail which arrivd from New York yesterday I had the honor to receive your letter of the 27th Octr. acquainting me of the melancholy news of the sudden death of the late King and this day his present Majesty was proclaimd in my Government in English at the head of the troops and in french to his Majestys Canadian Subjects.
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Since I had the honor to write to you last nothing extraordinary has happend here except the murder of two Tadusac Indians by John Collins Master of a New York Schooner which was wreckd near the mouth of the river Saguiney in attempting to make this Port.
I confind Collins upon his arrival here, he confessd the fact but declard it proceeded from self defence, which may be true, tho circumstances were against this opinion, and would induce me to think him entirely to blame had he not a very good character from many creditable people now residing in this town. By the intercession of the Hurons of Lorrette this affair has been accommodated to the satisfaction of the Savages consistant with the safety of the Prisoner and the dignity & justice of the British Government. In the course of this treaty the Savages desird I would acquaint all the King's Subjects that they having submitted [61] [sic.] to his Majesty's Governmt expected his Protection and to be exempted for the future from the insults of the crews of the ships trading in the river. I have in consequence begd of Gen'. Amherst to publish this request in the manner he shall think proper to his Majestys Colonies, and if it was hinted to the Vessels from Europe disorders may be prevented which when they happen Allienate the affections of the Indians and confirm them in the bad opinion of the English nation the French have assiduously endeavourd to instill into them.
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[1927lab]


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