The Labrador Boundary


Privy Council Documents


Volume VII
Contents




1 Deed executed
before Planté, at
Quebec,
22 April, 1808.

2 Deed executed
before Planté, at
Quebec,
22 April, 1808.

3 Deed executed
before Planté, at
Quebec,
22 April, 1808.







4 Deed of sale by
the Sheriff of
Quebec,
14 June, 1808



5 "Les Bourgeois
de la Compagnie du
Nord Ouest," vol. 11,
pp. 448-453.


6 Extract from the
Papier Terrier,
12 March, 1810.


7 Deed executed
before Guy, at
Montreal,
4 January, 1811.



8 Deed executed
before Paterson at
London, Eng.
14 March, 1823.


1 Deed executed
before Edie, at
Quebec, and before
Forsyth at
Montreal,
13 June, 1825.

2 Deed executed
before Macpherson,
at Quebec,
28 June, 1826.


3 Deed executed
before Macpherson,
at Quebec,
3 November, 1828.

4 Wm. Smith to
Keith,
14 January, 1832.




5 Deed executed
before Griffin,
at Montreal,
8 February, 1836.

6 Deed executed
before Taylor,
at West Flamboro, 3 August, 1837.





7 Extract from
the Papier Terrier,
9 October, 1837.

8 Extract from the
Papier Terrier,
9 October, 1837.






9 Deed executed
before J. G. Stewart,
at Quebec,
13 July, 1842.

1 Grants en Fief and
Ratifications of
same, prior to 1760,
by Judge Dunkin,
1852.


2 19-20 Vic.
chap. 53, 1856
(Chap. 41, sec. 35,
Revised Statutes of
Quebec, 1861).










3 Stuart to
Commissioner of
Crown Lands,
30 March, 1859.






4 Anderson to Fortin,
21 August, 1859.



5 Whitcher to
Commissioner of
Crown Lands,
24 September, 1860.












6 Denny to
Commissioner of
Crown Lands,
28 September, 1860.


7 Tessier to McDougall, 2 May, 1863.

1 Whitcher to
McDougall,
5 May, 1863.







2 Cadastre de la
Seigneurie de
Mingan, by Henry
Judah,
23 January, 1861.






3 Belleau to
Attorney General,
20 November, 1866







4 Deed executed
before Clapham, at
Quebec,
1 April, 1873.

5 Deed executed
before Griffin, at
Montreal,
1 December, 1868.



6 Patent signed by
Lieut. Gov. Belleau,
2 November, 1869.


7 36 Vic., cap. 3.
Statutes of Quebec,
1872.






8 Deed executed
before Marler, at
Montreal,
27 March, 1871.

9 Deed executed
before Clapham,
at Quebec,
1 April, 1873.


1 Deed executed
before Clapham, at
Quebec,
1 April, 1873.

2 Deed executed
before Marler, at
Montreal,
4 April, 1873.

3 Deed executed
before Clapham, at
Quebec,
15 September. 1873.

4 Deed executed
before Phillips, at
Montreal,
10 July, 1871.

5 Deed executed
before Spicer, at
Leamington, Eng.,
12 April, 1882.

6 Deed executed
before Gendreau, at
St. Thomas, Que.
28 September, 1883.

7 Deed executed
before Sirois, at
Quebec,
28 September, 1882.

8 Deed executed
before McLennan, at
Montreal,
8 October, 1883.


9 Judgment of
Superior Court
of Quebec,
18 September, 1858.

















10 Judgment of the
Court of the
Queen's Bench,
6 February, 1891.


p. 3159

1808, John Richardson, as curator of the estate of William Grant, deceased, sold the Isles de Mingan seigniory and also five forty-eighths, undivided, of St. Paul seigniory. The sale was made to Langan, Burns, Woolsey and Lymburner, in the proportion of Langan, one-half ; and Burns, one-sixth, Woolsey, one-sixth; Lymburner, one-sixth.1
Langan then sold to Richardson three-fourths of his rights and claims to aforesaid seigniories and posts, that is to say, three-eighths of Isles de Mingan, three-eighths of five forty-eighths of St. Paul and three-eighths of the fishing posts between Itamamiou and Anse-Sainte-Claire, retaining one-eighth of same for himself.2

1808, Richardson, Langan, Burns, Woolsey and Lymburner entered into partnership for 7 years (1807 to 1814), to trade and to operate the fishing establishments in Terre Ferme de Mingan, Isles de Mingan, and St. Paul and the posts between Itamamiou and Anse-Sainte-Claire, the partnership to be in the following proportions: Richardson, three-eighths; Langan, one-eighth; and Burns, Woolsey and Lymburner; one-sixth, each.
It was further stipulated that the “present company shall not be a general one but a private one under the name of Labrador new Concern.” Mathew Lymburner was appointed Agent and Manager.3

1808, the sheriff of Quebec sold to Patrick Langan, and John Blackwood, “one undivided third in the Fief and Seigniory of Mille Vaches. . . . . And also an exact undivided half of the whole of the Fief and Seigniory of the Terre ferme de Mingan.” As Blackwood desired a separate title deed, the Sheriff deeded to Blackwood, one-half of an undivided third in the Fief and Seigniory of Mille Vaches and also one-half of an “exact undivided half of the whole of the Fief and Seigniory of the Terre ferme de Mingan.” He also deeded same to Langan.4

1808, James McKenzie states that the North West Co. was operating Portneuf, Ile Jeremie, Godbout, Seven Islands, Mingan, Nepioshibu (Napesipi) and Masquaro posts.
He also says that Portneuf, Ile Jeremie. Mingan and Masquaro had chapels.5

1810, William Burns, in his own name and on behalf of his partners in the Labrador Company, performed faith and homage for their portion of Isles de Mingan seigniory and for live forty-eighths of St. Paul seigniory.6

1811, John Richardson bought from Patrick Langan his one-eighth interest in the seigniory of the Isles et Islets de Mingan, thus acquiring, in all, an undivided one-half interest in same.7

1823, Under and by Virtue of the terms of the will of John Blackwood, the executors of said will deeded to John and Alexander Greenshields and Andrew Weir, “one undivided sixth part” of and in the seigniory of Mille Vaches and “one undivided fourth part” of Terre Ferme de Mingan seigniory.8

p. 3160

1825, The lease of Terre Ferme de Mingan expired in 1822 but, presumably, the Hudson's Bay Company, as the successors to the North West Company, continued to hold under the old lease for three years (1822–1825). In 1825, John Richardson, John Greenshields, Alex. Greenshields, the heirs of Peter Stuart and the heirs of Thomas Dunn, claiming to be proprietors of Terre Ferme de Mingan seigniory, leased said seigniory to the Hudson's Bay Company for 20 years (1822–1842) for £500 cy. per annum. From 1842 to 1866, the Hudson's Bay Company continued as tenants of this seigniory.1

1826, Alexander Greenshields conveyed to John Greenshields “one undivided third part” of “the one undivided sixth part of the seigniory or fief of Mille Vaches,” also of the “one undivided fourth part of the seigniory or fief of Terre Ferme de Mingan.”2

1828, John Weir and his wife, Helen Blackwood Weir, conveyed to Thomas Weir, one-third part of “the one undivided sixth part” of Mille Vaches and one-third part “of the one undivided quarter“ of the seigniory of Terre Ferme de Mingan.3

1832, The Hudson's Bay Company authorised James Keith “to make proposals to Mr. H. G. Forsyth and the other proprietors of the [Anticosti] Island to take a lease of it.”4

1836, John Wm. Woolsey, Mathew Lymburner, the heirs of John Richardson and the executors of the will of Wm. Burns sold the seigniory of Isles et Islets de Mingan to the Hudson's Bay Company for £1,000 cy. Of the proprietors, one-half appertained to the heirs of John Richardson and one-sixth to each of the others.5

1837, James Weir sold to John B. Weir all his rights and claims to parts of the seigniories of Terre Ferme de Mingan and Mille Vaches.6

1837, John Greenshields, as owner of two undivided third parts of a sixth part of Mille Vaches and of two undivided third parts of a quarter of Terre Ferme de Mingan and James Weir, as owner of the other third of a sixth part of Mille Vaches and of the other third part, undivided, of a fourth part of Terre Ferme de Mingan, performed faith and homage.7

1837, John Stewart, in the name of the heirs of Peter Stuart, performed faith and homage for an undivided fourth of Terre Ferme de Mingan seigniory and of Anticosti.8

1842, John B. Weir, and John Greenshields, heirs and assigns of John Blackwood, deceased, and the heirs of Peter Stuart, of Thomas Dunn and of John Richardson, claiming to be proprietors of the seigniory of Terre Ferme de Mingan, leased said seigniory to the Hudson's Bay Company for 20 years (1842 to 1862), for an annual rental of £500 cy.9

1852, in a list of Seigniories in Lower Canada, prepared by Judge Dunkin for use before the Commission for commuting the Seigniorial tenure,

p. 3161

it is stated that Terre Ferme de Mingan seigniory was granted 25 February, 1661, by the Company of New France to Francois Bissot, Sieur de la Rivière.1

1856, The Seigniorial Amendment Act provided that : “Inasmuch as the following the Fiefs and Seigniories, namely : . . . . . Mingan and the Island of Anticosti are not settled . . . . . the casual and other rights of the Crown in the said seigniories shall be ascertained and entered in the schedule of the seigniory.”2

1859, G. Okill Stuart, representing General Dunn, a proprietor of a large portion of Terre Ferme de Mingan, Mille Vaches and Portneuf, wrote the Commissioner of Crown Lands that “the rights of the proprietors of these seigniories were interfered with, by the Crown, some years ago, in granting the license of the King's Posts to Mr. Goudie. Heavy claims for indemnity were in consequence preferred by him, against the Crown.......I have deemed it expedient to bring these seigniories under your notice, so that the Crown may not interfere with the rights of the proprietors by their contemplated mode of granting licenses” for the occupation of “inferior coast fishing stations” on the St. Lawrence.3

1859, on behalf of the Hudson's Bay Company, James Anderson protested to Stipendiary Magistrate Fortin, “against the legality of the licenses issued this summer, to various individuals to fish” the St. John river within the limits of Terre Ferme de Mingan seigniory, on the ground that said company as lessees of said seigniory, held the “exclusive rights of hunting, farming, fishing and trading with the Indians” within its limits.4

1860, W. F. Whitcher wrote the Commissioner of Crown Lands that the “Crown contends that the River Goynish or Agwanus forms” the east limit of Terre Ferme de Mingan seigniory.5
Whitcher suggested that “it might be deemed just and expedient to accept the Seigniors', offer of executing fishery leases with the Crown, conditioning that the present occupiers shall be dealt with by sub-lease.”

1860, Col. Wm. Denny, representing one-fourth share of Terre Ferme de Mingan and one-sixth of Mille Vaches, “by marriage into the family of the late Hon. John Richardson,” tendered, on behalf of his co-seigniors, for the net and rod fishing in Terre Ferme and Mille Vaches seigniories. He stated that his offer was made “without prejudice to the rights of the seigneurs to claim compensation for the loss of the exclusive right over those fisheries.”6

1863, U. J. Tessier wrote the Commissioner of Crown Lands, suggesting that a surveyor be instructed to sub-divide the “land into lots, at all the important stations on the Crown property” between Portneuf and Blanc Sablon.7

1863, W. F. Whitcher wrote the Commissioner of Crown Lands that “there is no danger of the settlers being disturbed because the existing lease

p. 3162

between the Seigniors and the [Hudson's Bay] Company has other two years to rim” and that “it would not be advisable for the Crown to commit a trespass by surveying private property.”1

1864, Henry Judah made the cadastre of the “Seigneurie de Mingan. (ou de Terra Ferma de Mingan), possedée par les héritiers Richardson.” He states that it is situated in the county of Saguenay and is not conceded; that it has 50 leagues of front by two leagues in depth, extending from cape Cormorant to the river Goynish and includes an area of 705,400 arpents. He certified the value at $70,540.2

1866, N. F. Belleau, Counsel for the Attorney General of Lower Canada, recommended in an Opinion : That the eastern boundary of Terre Ferme de Mingan “be established with the co-operation of the proprietors at the request of the Crown.” He pointed out that, if the seigniors refuse to admit that the Goynish river is the eastern boundary, they will “have to show where is the Grande Anse towards the Esquimaux. where the Spaniards formerly used to fish.”3
Pending such action as suggested above. Belleau recommended that the proclamation erecting Duval township be not issued.

1866, the lease of Terre Ferme de Mingan was terminated in this year. By a new agreement, the area leased to the Hudson's Bay Co. was reduced to the post of Mingan and a tract of about six square miles surrounding it. In 1873, said lease was still running.4

1868, John Blackwood Weir sold to Donald Lorne McDougall one-twelfth share of and in the seigniory of Terre Ferme de Mingan.5

1869, the Department of Crown Lands sold certain lots in Duval township near the Natashkwan river to Henry Thomas, Adolphe Laflamme and Jean Langlois, stipulating that “in the event of any action at law being instituted to eject” Thomas, et al, said purchasers shall “bear the expense and costs of defence.”6

1872, an Act of the Legislature of Quebec erected the parish of St. Pierre de Is Pointe aux Esquimaux. The Act stated that said parish included “part of the Seigniory of Mingan.”7

1873, Ann, Eweretta and Charlotte Richardson, each owning one undivided sixteenth of Terre Ferme de Mingan and John Richardson Auldjo, Louis Auldjo and E. Helen Auldjo, each owning one-eightieth, sold their respective shares to Alexander Denistoun “as well for himself as in trust for his associates,” Hugh Allan, Andrew Allan, J. J. Redpath, George A. Drummond and J. O. Beaubien.8

1873, the daughters and son of William Taylor Peter Shortt sold one undivided quarter of Terre Ferme de Mingan seignoiry to Alex. Dennistoun and associates.9

p. 3163

1873, William Hew Dunn sold to Alexander Dennistoun “five undivided twenty-fourths, or five-sixths of an undivided quarter,” of the seigniory of Terre Ferme de Mingan, the sale being subject to the lease to the Hudson's Bay Company. Dennistoun effected the purchase “as well for himself as in trust for his associates.” 1

1873, Alex. Thos. Paterson and Donald Lorn McDougall, owning one-sixth and one-twelfth, respectively, of Terre Ferme de Mingan, sold said shares to Alex. Dennistoun and associates.2

1873, Ann Catherine Dunn, wife of William Rhodes, sold one undivided twenty-fourth of Terre Ferme de Mingan seigniory to Alex. Dennistoun and associates.3

1874, Eweretta Jane Auldjo, wife of Edward Alexander Prentice, sold one undivided eightieth of Terre Ferme de Mingan seigniory to Alex. Dennistoun and associates.4

1882, Mary Eweretta Richardson, daughter of Henry Ogden Andrews, sold one undivided eightieth of Terre Ferme de Mingan to Alex. Dennistoun and associates.5

1882, Octave Vincelot Beaubien, son of Joseph O. Beaubien, deceased, sold to Alex. Dennistoun the interest in Terre Ferme de Mingan which he had inherited from his father.6

1882, Alix Fremont, daughter of J. O. Beaubien, sold to Alexander Dennistoun, the interest in Terre Ferme de Mingan which she had inherited from her father.7

1883, the Labrador Company, incorporated as a joint stock company, acquired the seigniory of Terre Ferme de Mingan, from Dennistoun and his associates for $100,000.8

1888, The Superior Court of Quebec rendered judgment in re The Queen vs. Labrador Company. The judgment declared that the Labrador Company, as owners of Terre Ferme de Mingan seigniory, had no title to any territory between the river Goynish and the eastern boundary of Quebec.9

1891, The Court of the Queen's Bench rendered judgment in re the appeal of The Queen and the Labrador Company against the decision of Justice Routhier in the Superior Court. The judgment stated that the terms of 19-20 Vic., chap. 53, 1856, commonly known as the Seigniorial Tenure Act, expressly recognised the existence of a seigniory of Terre Ferme de Mingan and made provision for the cadastre of same ; that Henry Judah, a Seigniorial Tenure commissioner, had made a cadastre of said seigniory, and had described the limits of same ; that said cadastre had not been contested ; that said actions had definitely determined and established the rights of the Labrador Company, and had, virtually established a seigniory which, thitherto, had been non-existent ; and that the judgment of the Superior Court was confirmed, the seigniory of Terre Ferme de Mingan to include an area two leagues in depth and extending from cape Cormorant to the river Agwanus or Goynish.10

[1927lab]



Partnered Projects Government and Politics - Table of Contents Site Map Search Heritage Web Site Home