The Labrador Boundary


Privy Council Documents


Volume VI
Contents




[8 April, 1762.]

1762. April 8th. Letter to Francis Fauquier, Esq. Lieut.-Govr. of Virginia in answer to one from him of the 30th of Novr. last respecting the lands of the Indians.

[7 Oct., 1763.]



p. 3106
C



No. 1225.

LORDS OF TRADE TO THE LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR OF VIRGINIA, 8 APRIL, 1762.

PUBLIC RECORDS OFFICE, C.O. 5/1368.

VIRGINIA.

To Francis Fauquier Esqr, Lieut Governor of Virginia.
Sir,
We have had under our consideration your letter to us of the 30th Novemer last and the papers transmitted with it, and as We do entirely agree with the late Commissioners for Trade and Plantations in the opinion expressed in their Letter to you of the 17th of Febry 1761, that whatever may tend to alarm the jealousy of the Indians and awaken in their minds a suspicion of any intention on our part to encroach upon their property cannot fail of having the most fatal consequencies, We do therefore think that for the present and untill our Indian Interests are settled upon a more firm & lasting basis, all attempts to make new Settlements upon the Lands to the west of the great mountains ought to be discouraged.
The concessions made by a few Indians at Lancaster in 1744, and at Logs Town in 1752, are so vague and void of precision, as well with respect to the Lands ceded as to the Terms and conditions of the Cession, that no reasonable Claim can in our opinion be founded upon them, and the Transactions at Easton, as well as what has passed since between the Indians and His Majesty's Generals and Governors, bear with them such strong pledges on the part of the Crown and of those who hold or act under it's authority that no Settlements whatever except what shall be absolutely necessary for securing the Dominion of the Country shall be made in that part of it beyond the Allighany hills, as not to leave the least room to doubt of the Impropriety of any further Grants of Lands in that part of the Country for the present.
The same reasons do in great measure oppose themselves to the running any boundary Line between Pensylvania and Virginia, & the proprietor of Pensylvania by whom we have been attended upon this occasion, seeing this matter in the same light and agreeing with Us in opinion, has declared, that he has not the least Intention for the present to continue his South Line beyond the limits of Lord Baltimore's grant, and that he will at no time proceed upon it, without giving previous timely notice thereof, and

p. 3107

therefore we shall for the present suspend all Consideration of the Proposition contain'd in your letter, that Commissioners should be named on the part of the Crown, to be join'd with those appointed, for running the boundary line between Maryland and Pensylvania.
We have received your letter of the 24th of Febry last and the papers transmitted with it by His Majesty's Ship Diana and as soon as our Counsel shall have examined the Acts of the two last Sessions, we shall take them into our Consideration. We are
Sir,
Your most obedient,
humble Servants
SANDYS.
ED. ELIOT.
ED. BACON.
John Roberts.
     Exd.
Whitehall,
       April 8th 1762.


C
No. 1226.

ROYAL PROCLAMATION OF OCTOBER 7, 1763.

(CLAUSES RE RESERVATION OF INDIAN LANDS.)



(Vide Vol. 1, Page 156.)

[1927lab]


Partnered Projects Government and Politics - Table of Contents Site Map Search Heritage Web Site Home