The Labrador Boundary


Privy Council Documents


Volume VI
Contents




[20 Sept., 1830]

[23 June, 1832.]

[1834.]



p. 2783
C


No. 1106.

LETTER TO THE GOVERNOR AND COMMITTEE OF THE HONBLE. HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY.



RECORDS, HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY.
Fort Chimo, Sept., 20th, 1830.

Honble Sir:
I had the pleasure to see the Brig. Montcalm, Captain Robert Royal Commander anchor abreast of us on the 13th of this month, having been piloted from the outlet of this river by Mr. Erlandson who had sounded it previously ; there is water for vessels of any burden to come up with a fair wind. Altho' the Montcalm lost the whole of her false keel—this was owing, I believe to the mate's mistaking an eddy for sunken rocks and steering into shallow but smooth water contrary to Mr. Erlandson's advice. This gentle-man manned a boat and sounded fathoms outside about 50 yards from the ships. He has received however, no material injury.
*            *             *             *
I endeavoured in vain to hire some Indians as hunters here, no inducement could prevail upon them to go and hunt at South River. This was contrary to my expectations. Our canoes being small, I was obliged to leave part of my outfit at this place, provisions as well as other necessaries—we carried heavy packed in along with us to Richmond Gulf where we arrived on the 13th July, but were detained at Little Whale River three days by our guides refusing to accompany us farther—the seed of this discontent was sown by an old Esquimeau hunter and his band whom we met there and who endeavoured to persuade us to return, saying we never could get to South River and giving a very frightful picture of the country and its inhabitants—although they failed with us they were more successful with my guides and people, who got quite low spirited and I believe would have mutinied had they dared, the cause of this disaffection to the Expedition in these Indians was a fear that we should supply the Esquimaux, their ancient enemies, with the means of retaliating the many injuries they have received at their hands.
*            *             *             *
Having arrived at a river which empties itself in Natwakamy from the S.ward our guides absolutely refused to accompany us further and rather than be pestered with their murmurs, I sent them back from this branch. I found my way down without meeting any accident and arrived here on the 1st August and having examined the River for nearly a week, pitched on this

p. 2784

spot as the most eligible situation for the establishment, the most convenient for the vessels from Europe to be at and the best wintering berth for a sloop but greatly destitute of wood and clay, being situate about half way between the Pulgewah of the Moravian Mission and Mr. Hendry's "best ground seen" both which are not at all convenient.
*            *             *             *
I have only seen two parties of Esquimaux consisting of about ten families but as they had visited Okkak, the nearest Missionary Settlement in the course of the summer, had nothing to trade. Our meeting was friendly in the extreme and when I told them by the interpreter that they would be supplied with every necessity for furs, oil &c., &c., their joy was unbounded —foxes they say of color as well as white are plentiful, but the fear of meeting any of the inland Indians prevents them from going into the interior in search of other fur animals—am sanguine in the hope that a reconciliation may be effected between the two nations—the Indians, I should imagine will not be averse to a peace, as they must know that the Esquimaux will have it now in their power to retaliate.
*            *             *             *
Enclosed Your Honors will find copy of a certificate I gave Captain Royal signed by Mr. Erlandson and myself, and which I thought necessary to send to you for your satisfaction—the last of the ships cargo was landed yesterday and he is to break ground today—Mr. E. is to pilot her out of the River—to whose active services I am much indebted—Mr. Taylor also has been useful. Having nothing else worth communicating except a sincere wish for the prosperity of your undertakings, I have the honor to be

Honble. Sirs, &c, &c, &c.,

NICOL FINLAYSON.


No. 1107.
C
FACTOR AT FORT CHIMO TO W. ERLANDSON.


RECORDS, HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY.

Dear Sir:—
You are hereby directed to proceed into the Interior and establish a trading post some where up the Wasquash River which empties itself into South River a little above Clouston's falls—from this place you will take up an Indian to guide you to the lake or the place you may deem most eligible for the establishment—on arriving at which it would be prudent to get a store

p. 2785

built provided you think the canoes would be back here by the 25th or last of July to take up the rest of the supplies—to accomplish which you will of course be under the necessity to send all the men down.
As you are well acquainted with the manners and habits of the Indians who hunt to the N.ward of Eastmain and whose habits are nearly similar to those we have seen here—it is unnecessary in me to give you instructions regarding your mode of dealing with them. Your own good sense and long experience in the trading department will point out the best mode—tho' I cannot help observing that they must have seen strong Opposition and must be curtailed of many things usually lavished upon Indians at such places, especially now that the King's Posts are in the hands of the Honble. Hudson's Bay Company.
*            *            *            *
Having nothing else to communicate except my sincere good wishes for the success of your undertaking, I remain &c., &c.,

NICOL FINLAYSON.
Ft. Chimo, 23rd June, 1832.



No. 1108.
C
EXTRACT FROM ERLAND ERLANDSON'S JOURNAL OF THE VOYAGE FROM FORT CHIMO, UNGAVA, TO ESQUIMAUX BAY, LABRADOR, AND THENCE BACK TO THE FORT, 1834.


RECORDS, HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY.
I would certainly recommend Pettastickopau lake as the most eligible place for an inland Post principally because it is surrounded by a good Fur Country.

*            *            *            *
If a communication with the Mingan Deptm't be an object of importance, no post could be better situated for facilitating such a measure, because the Indians invariably pass thro' that Lake, when visiting at the N.W. River, Mingan, Seven Island Bay or even Port Neuf.

[1927lab]


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