p. 2188C



No. 930.

EXTRACT FROM CONVENTION BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND FRANCE,

RELATIVE TO THE RIGHTS OF FISHERY ON THE COAST OF NEWFOUNDLAND AND ON THE NEIGHBOURING COASTS. SIGNED AT LONDON, 14 JAN., 1857.1



ARTICLE I.

French subjects shall have the exclusive right to fish, and to use the strand for fishery purposes, during the season elsewhere specified (Article VIII.), on the east coast of Newfoundland, from Cape St. John to the Quirpon Islands. They shall also have the right to fish, and to use the strand for fishery purposes, during the said season, to the exclusion of British subjects, on the north coast of Newfoundland, from the Quirpon Islands to Cape Norman ; and on the west coast, in and upon the five fishing-harbours of Port-au-Choix, Small Harbour (or Petit Port), Port-au-Port, Red Island, and Cod Roy Island. Such exclusive fishing, from the Quirpon Islands to Cape Norman, shall extend to a distance of three marine miles due north from a straight line joining Cape Norman and Cape Bauld, and as regards the five harbours, shall extend to within a radius of three marine miles in all directions from the centre of each such harbour, but with power to the Commissioners or Umpire, elsewhere provided for in this Convention, to alter such limits for each harbour, in accordance with the existing practice.
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ARTICLE III.

French subjects shall have the right, concurrently with British subjects, to fish on the coasts of Labrador, from Blanc Sablon to Cape Charles, and of North Belleisle, together with liberty to dry and cure fish on any of the portions of the coast of North Belleisle aforesaid, which shall not be settled when this Convention shall come into operation. The British Government, however, retains the right to erect thereon buildings for military or public purposes ; and if any settlement for permanent habitation shall be thereafter established on any portion of the coast of the said island, the right of French subjects to dry and cure fish on such portion of the coast shall cease, one season's notice of such settlement having been given beforehand to the French Commander on the station.

1 “A Complete Collections of Treaties and Conventions.” By Lewis Hertslet. Vol. X, pp. 750—752.

p. 2189

The said French concurrent right of fishing shall terminate at the embouchures or outlets of rivers and creeks : the place of each embouchure or outlet shall be determined, in the manner elsewhere specified in this Convention, by the Commissioners or Umpire.
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ARTICLE VII.

From Cape St. John to Rock Point in the Bay of Islands, the French right of fishing shall extend up all rivers or creeks, as high as the salt water. From Rock Point to Cape Ray the right shall be limited to half a marine mile above the embouchure or outlet of each river or creek.
The point hereby limited for each river or creek from Cape St. John to Rock Point, and from Rock Point to Cape Ray, shall be settled in the manner elsewhere provided for by the Commissioners or Umpire.

ARTICLE VIII.

The French season of fishery on the coast of Newfoundland, Labrador, and North Belleisle, shall extend from the fifth of April to the fifth of October.
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ARTICLE X.

The strand reserved for French exclusive use for fishery purposes shall extend to one-third of an English mile inland from high-water mark, from Rock Point to Bonne Bay, inclusive, and at the four reserved harbours south of Bonne Bay ; and from Bonne Bay to Cape St. John, to half an English mile inland from high-water mark.
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[1927lab]


 

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