p. 2129N



No. 903.

EXTRACTS FROM BOOKS ON INTERNATIONAL LAW.



WESTLAKE—IINTERNATIONAL LAW, Part 1, page 112.

Cites principle laid down by negotiators for the United States in disputes with Spain and Great Britain—

“That whenever any European nation takes possession of any extent of sea coast, that possession is understood as extending into the interior country to the sources of the rivers emptying within that coast, to all their branches and the country they cover and to give it a right in exclusion of all other nations to the same.”




LAWRENCE—PRINCIPLES OF INTERNATIONAL LAW, p. 151 (3rd Edn.)

Occupation of a considerable extent of coast gives a title up to the watershed of the rivers which enter the sea along the occupied line. . . . If a coast line is effectively occupied, the rivers which fall into the sea throughout its extent and the country drained by them are held to belong in full sovereignty to the power whose settlements are dotted along the shore.



HALL—INTERNATIONAL LAW, p. 104 (5th Edn.)

It has generally been admitted that occupation of the coast carries with it a right to the whole territory drained by the rivers which empty their waters within its line.

[1927lab]


 

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