p. 2103C



No. 884.

EXTRACT FROM DECISION OF THE PERMANENT COURT OF ARBITRATION AT THE HAGUE,

ON THE SCOPE AND MEANING OF ARTICLE 1 OF THE CONVENTION SIGNED AT LONDON ON THE 20 OCTOBER, 1818, BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND THE UNITED STATES.*



“ The correspondence between Mr. Adams and Lord Bathurst . . . shows that during the negotiations for the Treaty the United States demanded the former rights enjoyed under the Treaty of 1783, and that Lord Bathurst in the letter of 30th October, 1815, made no objection to granting those 'former rights' 'placed under some modifications,' which latter did not relate to the right of fishing in bays, but only to the 'pre-occupation of British harbours and creeks by the fishing vessels of the United States and he forcible exclusion of British subjects where the fishery might be most advantageously conducted,' and 'to the clandestine introduction of prohibited goods into the British colonies.' It may be therefore assumed that the word 'coast' is used in both Treaties in the same sense, including bays.”

*Copied from "North Atlantic Coast Fisheries Arbitration at the Hague" (Washington : 1912), Vol. I, p. 100.

[1927lab]


 

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