p. 1994
C



No. 823.

EXTRACT  FROM  “LABRADOR,”

BY WILFRED T. GRENFELL AND OTHERS, NEW ED.(NEW YORK, 1922), p. 282.



“ Nearly three hundred years ago it was known that this fish was plentiful on the southern coast of the peninsula, and ever since the cod-fishery has been more or less vigorously pursued on the Labrador.  In former times the herring, and always the salmon, has furnished minor parts in the harvest from the coastal waters, but it is remarkable that, in Newfoundland and Labrador, ‘fish’ is a synonym merely for cod ;  a local law has stated that salmon is not fish.  Other members of the Gadidæ family, as the hake, tusk, haddock, whiting, coalfish, pollack, ling, and whiting-pout, are absent or present in negligible quantities. A flounder is the only noteworthy representative of the flatfish family.  The halibut is found only in deep water, far from shore.”


[1927lab]


 

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