p. 1989                                  C



No. 816.

EXTRACT FROM CLOSING ARGUMENT OF
RICHARD H. DANA, JR.,

ON BEHALF OF THE UNITED STATES, BEFORE THE HALIFAX FISHERY COMMISSION, APPOINTED UNDER THE TREATY OF WASHINGTON, 8 MAY, 1871.¹


        “ Your Honours will also observe that, until 1830, the mackerel fisheries were unknown. There was no fishery but the cod-fishery. The cod-fisheries were all the parties had in mind in making the Treaty of 1818, and to this day, as you have observed from some of the witnesses, 'fishing,' by the common speech of Gloucester fishing, means, ex vi termini, cod-fishing. Fishing is one thing, and 'mackereling' is another. In Mr. Adams' pamphlet, on the 23rd page, he speaks of 'fishery,' as synonymous with cod-fishery.”

¹ Copied from Record of Proceedings of the Halifax Fishery Commission, 1877, p. 263.





No. 817.                                  C

EXTRACT FROM “NOTES ON THE NORTHERN LABRADOR FISHING GROUNDS,

BY PROFESSOR H. Y. HIND.²



        “ During my visit to the Labrador last summer I was rather surprised to find that the Newfoundland fishermen appeared to place entire reliance upon four kinds of bait for cod, namely, the caplin, the squid, the herring and the launce. I gathered from conversation with many of them, that the opinion prevailed that the cod were nourished almost exclusively upon this food, and that where there were no caplin, &c., there would be no 'fish,' as the cod is popularly termed.”

² Ibid., 1877, p. 754J.

[1927lab]


 

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