The Labrador Boundary


Privy Council Documents


Volume XII


Contents








9 Nov., 1926.

Sir John Simon.

9 Nov., 1926.

Sir John Simon.

9 Nov., 1926.

Sir John Simon.

Viscount Finlay.

Sir John Simon.

9 Nov., 1926.

Sir John Simon.

9 Nov., 1926.

Sir John Simon.

Viscount Finlay.

Sir John Simon.




p. 846

—an indication that he sailed just at that time ; I am pretty sure that that is so, but I cannot give you the page. The spring has come, the ice is beginning to break up and they leave the country about the end of April.

Lord WARRINGTON : He is directed to put to sea and take great care to do so without a moment's loss of time.

Sir JOHN SIMON : That is so ; he is a little later than usual ;they usually went about the end of April. Then on May the 5th comes the matter which introduces my Indian question. That is in Volume III, at page 899.

Lord WARRINGTON : You have finished with the Commission of Newfoundland and you are beginning a new subject altogether ?

Sir JOHN SIMON : Yes, that is right. In my humble submission (your Lordships will decide in the end whether I am right) what had happened was that by May you had got this much done. You had got already what I have called the horseshoe of Hudson Bay carved out long ago and, if there was any doubt about it, Lord Egremont had had some information. You had got, as I humbly submit, the carving out, whatever it may turn out to be on the ground, of an area which was to be ascertained on similar principles on the Atlantic coast and indeed down to the St. John, because it was before the pink was cut out. Now comes the question : ”We have really settled this Labrador business. Part of it is Hudson's Bay and the rest of it we have settled ; we have disposed of that , now we want to address ourselves to the question of what is the proper way in which to deal with these important and fruitful possessions which are the result of our victories over the French.“ This is why I have, I am afraid, so frequently repeated that it seems to me to give quite a wrong historical balance to the case to suppose that, in reference to that second and different subject matter and all the troubles about the Indian wars and all the rest of it, they were really thinking about this icebound strip. You will find when you look at it that everything that is done now is done in reference to an area which is to the west and to the south. The maps which are drawn are maps which do not even include Labrador. The officials that are appointed Commissioners of the Indian territory are Commissioners over areas which do not include Labrador, and the whole thing now from beginning to end is shifted into a perfectly different part of the country. That is the reason why these documents in Volume III now become of such extreme importance. I will do my best to keep to Volume III for a little bit. In Volume III, as your Lordships know well, is the origin of this new inquiry which one of your Lordships has just said appears to be a separate inquiry. It is May 5th, 1763. Lord Egremont did not give these unfortunate Lords of Trade much rest ; they are now turned on to their new mission. Would your Lordships look at line 11 : ”is now pleased to fix His Royal Attention upon the

p. 847

next important Object.“ It is a new object and it has reference to a new area. If you had asked Dr. Johnson, who was living at the time, where it was that the French had formerly had the trading interest and the enjoyment of the advantages of the French Empire, and where it was that Britain had got it instead, he would never have said in Labrador, in Naskopiland ; he would have said in the valley of the Ohio and the Mississippi ; and, of course, he would have been right.

(Adjourned for a short time.)

[1927lab]




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