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    That the welfare of a sparce and widely scattered population of British subjects of European origin, already inhabiting these remote and unorganized territories, would be materially enhanced by the formation therein of political institutions bearing analogy, as far as circumstances will admit, to those which exist in the several Provinces of this Dominion.

    That the 146th section of the "British North American Act, 1867," provides for the admission of Rupert's Land and the North-western Territory, or either of them, into union with Canada, upon the terms and conditions to be expressed in addresses from the Houses of Parliament of this Dominion to your Majesty, and which shall be approved of by your Majesty in Council.

    That we do therefore most humbly pray that your Majesty will be graciously pleased, by and with the advice of your Most Honorable Privy Council, to unite Rupert's Land and the North-western Territory with this Dominion, and to grant to the Parliament of Canada authority to legislate for their future welfare and good Government; and we most humbly beg to express to your Majesty that we are willing to assume the duties and obligations of government and legislation as regards these territories.

    That in the event of your Majesty's Government agreeing to transfer to Canada the jurisdiction and control over the said region, the Government and Parliament of Canada will be ready to provide that the legal rights of any corporation, company or individual within the same shall be respected, and placed under the protection of Courts of competent jurisdiction.

    And furthermore that, upon the transference of the territories in question to the Canadian Government, the claims of the Indian tribes to compensation for lands required for purposes of settlement will be considered and settled in conformity with the equitable principles which have uniformly governed the British Crown in its dealings with the aborigines.

    All which we humbly pray your Majesty to take into your Majesty's Most gracious and favorable consideration.

The Senate, Tuesday, December 17th, 1867.
(Signed), JOSEPH CAUCHON, Speaker.
House of Commons, Monday, December 16th, 1867.
(Signed), JAMES COCKBURN, Speaker.

SCHEDULE (B).
1. Resolutions.
May 28th, 1869.  

    Resolved,— That the Senate and Commons of the Dominion of Canada during the first session of the first Parliament of Canada, adopted an Address to Her Majesty, praying that Her Majesty would be graciously pleased, by

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and with the advice of Her Most Honorable Privy Council, under the provisions of 146th section of "The British North America Act, 1867"; and on the terms specified in the Address, to unite Rupert's Lands and the North-west Territory with this Dominion, and to grant to the Parliament of Canada authority to legislate for their future welfare and good government, and assuring Her Majesty of the willingness of the Parliament of Canada to assume the duties and obligations of government and legislation as regards those territories.

    Resolved,— That the Joint Address of the Senate and Commons of Canada was duly laid at the foot of the throne, and that Her Majesty, by despatch from the Right Honorable the Secretary of State for the Colonies, to the Governor General of Canada, under date of 23rd of April, 1868, signified Her willingness to comply with the prayer of the said Address; but She was advised that the requisite powers of government and legislation could not, consistently with the existing charter of the Hudson's Bay Company, be transfered to Canada without an Act of Parliament, which Act was subsequently passed by the Imperial Parliament, and received Her Majesty's Assent on the 31st July, 1868.

    Resolved,— That by despatch dated 8th August, 1868, from the Honorable Secretary of State for the Colonies, the Governor-General was informed, that in pursuance of the Powers conferred by the Act for the surrender of the Hudson Bay Territories to Her Majesty, he proposed to enter into negotations with the Company as to the terms of such surrender, whereupon, under authority of an order of the Governor-General in Council of the 1st October, 1868, the Honorable Sir George Et. Cartier, Baronet, and the Honorable William MacDougall, C.B., were appointed a Delegation to England, to arrange the terms for the acquisition by Canada of Rupert's Land, and by another Order in Council of the same date, were authorized to arrange for the admission of the North-west Territory into union with Canada, either with or without Rupert's Land, as it might be found practicable and expedient.

    And whereas a draft surrender has been submitted to the Governor-General of Canada containing stipulations to the following effect, viz.: —

    Resolved,— That the Delegates proceeded on their mission to England and entered into negotiations with his Grace the Duke of Buckingham and Chandos, the Secretary of State for the Colonies, and afterwards with the Right Honorable Earl Granville, his successor in office, for the acquisition by Canada of the territorial and other rights claimed by the Hudson's Bay Company in Rupert's Land, and in any other part of British North America, not comprised in Rupert's Land, Canada, or British Columbia. That terms of agreement were conditionally assented to by the Delegates on behalf of the Dominion, and on their return to Canada were submitted with a Report dated 8th May, 1869, which was approved by His Excellency the Governor in Council, on the 14th day of the same month.

    Resolved,— That the Senate will be prepared to concur in accepting the transfer of the territorial and other rights of the Hudson's Bay Company in Rupert's Land, and in any other part of British North America, not comprised

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in Rupert's Land, Canada or British Columbia, on the terms conditionally agreed to on behalf of the Government of Canada, by the Hon. Sir George Et. Cartier, Baronet, and the Hon. William MacDougall, C.B., and on behalf of the Hudson's Bay Company, by Sir Stafford H. Northcote, Governor of that Company, and approved by His Excellency in Council as aforesaid, which terms are set forth in a letter from Sir Frederic Rogers, Under-Secretary of State for the Colonies, of the 9th March, 1869, communicated to the Delegates by direction of Earl Granville, and in two subsequent Memorandums dated respectively 22nd and 29th March, 1869, containing a modification of such terms, and are in the words and figures following:

"Terms, as started in the Letter from Sir Frederic Rogers, of March, 1869.

    "1. The Hudson's Bay Company to surrender to Her Majesty all the rights of Government, property, &c., in Rupert's Land which are specified in 31 & 32 Vict., cap. 105, sec. 4; and also all similar rights in any other part of British North America, not comprised in Rupert's Land, Canada or British Columbia.

    "2. Canada is to pay to the Company 300,000l., when Rupert's Land is transferred to the Dominion of Canada.

    "3. The Company may, within twelve months of the surrender, select a block of land adjoining each of its stations, within the limits specified in Article 1.

    "4. The size of the blocks not to exceed acres in the Red River Territory, and the aggregate extent of the blocks is not to exceed 50,000 acres.

    "5. So far as the configuration of the country admits, the blocks are to be in the shape of parallelograms, of which the length is not more than double the breadth.

    "6. The Hudson's Bay Company may, for fifty years after the surrender, claim in any township or district within the Fertile Belt in which land is set out for Settlement, select grants of land, not exceeding one-twentieth of the land so set out. The blocks so granted to be determined by lot, and the Hudson's Bay Company to pay a rateable share of the survey expenses, not exceeding an acre.

    "7. For the purpose of the present agreement, the Fertile Belt is to be bounded as follows: — On the south by the United States' boundary; on the west by the Rocky Mountains; on the north by the northern branch of the Saskatchewan; on the east by Lake Winnipeg, the Lake of the Woods, and the waters connecting them.

    "8. All titles to land up to the 8th March, 1869, conferred by the Company, are to be confirmed.

    "9. The Company is to be at liberty to carry on its trade without hindrance, in its corporate capacity and no exceptional tax is to be placed

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on the Company's land, trade or servants, nor any import duty on goods introduced by them previous to the surrender.

    "10. Canada is to take over the materials of the electric telegraph at cost price, such price including transport but not including interest for money, and subject to a deduction for ascertained deteriorations.

    "11. The Company's claim to land under agreement of Messrs. Vankoughnet and Hopkins to be withdrawn.

    "12. The details of this arrangement, the including the filling up blanks in Article 4 and 6, to be settled at once by mutual agreement."

"MEMORANDUM.

"Details of Agreement between the Delegates of the Government of the Dominion, and the Directors of the Hudson's Bay Company.

    "1. It is understood that, in surrendering to Her Majesty, all the rights, &c., of the Company in any part of British North America not comprised in Rupert's Land, Canada or British Columbia, the Company are to retain the posts they actually occupy in the North West Territory.

    "2. It is understood that it will be a sufficient act of selection under Article III., that the Company should, within twelve months, name the number of acres which they will require adjoining each post. The actual survey to be proceeded with, with all convenient speed.

    "3. It is understood that in the Red River Settlement, the size of the blocks to be retained round Upper Fort Garry shall not exceed (10) acres; and that round Lower Fort Garry shall not exceed (300) acres.

    "4. It is understood that a list of the stations round which the Company will require blocks of land, with the size of the blocks they will require, shall be made out forthwith, and communicated to the Canadian Ministers.

    "5. It is understood that Article V. shall be construed to mean that the blocks shall front the river or road, by which means of access are provided, and shall be approximately in the form of parallelograms, of which the frontage shall not be more than half the depth.

    "6. It is understood that the Company may defer the exercise of their right of claiming their proportion of each township for not more than ten years after it is set out; but their claim must be limited to an allotment from the lands remaining unsold at the time they declare their intention to make it.

    "7. It is understood that the Blank in Article 6 shall be filled up with 8 cents (Canadian).

    "8. It is understood that any claims of Indians to compensation for lands required for purposes of settlement shall be disposed of by the Canadian

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Government, in communication with the Imperial Government, and that the Company shall be relieved of all responsibility in respect of them.

(Signed.)           "STAFFORD H. NORTHCOTE.
"G. E. CARTIER.                      
"W. MACDOUGALL.               
   "March 22, 1869.

"Memorandum of a further Agreement between Sir Geo. Et. Cartier and Sir Stafford Northcote.

    "Inasmuch as the northern branch of the Saskatchewan River is the northern boundary of the Fertile Belt, and therefore any land of the northern bank is not within the territory of which the Company are to have one-twentieth part, it is understood that, in forming the townships abutting on the northern bank, the Company shall be at liberty to take their one-twentieth of any such townships, giving up to the Canadian Dominion an equal quantity of the portion of lands coming to them of townships established on the southern bank.

    "It is understood that the townships on the northern bank shall not for the above purpose extend more than five miles inland from the river.

    "It is understood that, in laying out any public roads, canals &c., through any block of land reserved to the Company, the Canadian Government may take, without compensation, such land as is necessary for the purpose, not exceeding one-twenty-fifth of the total acreage of the block; but if the Canadian Government require any land which is actually under cultivation, or which has been built upon, or which is necessary for giving the Company's servants access to any river or lake, or as a frontage to any river or lake, they shall pay the Company the fair value of the same, and shall make compensation for any injury done to the Company or their servants.

    "It is understood that the whole of the land to be appropriated within the meaning of the last preceding clause shall be appropriated for public purposes."

(Signed.)           "GEO. ET. CARTIER.           
"STAFFORD NORTHCOTE.  

"London, March 29, 1869."

    Resolved, — That this House learns with satisfaction, by letter from the Under-Secretary of State for the Colonies, of 9th March last, that, in fulfilment of the expectations held out in Mr. Cardwell's despatch of 17th June, 1865, Her Majesty's Government will be prepared to propose to Parliament that the Imperial guarantee be given to a loan of 300,000l., the amount which is proposed to be paid over by Canada on the transfer of the Company's rights.

    Resolved, — That the Senate will be ready to concur with the House of Commons in an Address to Her Majesty, that she will be graciously pleased,

[1927lab]

 



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