Matching Articles"Climate" (Total 39)

  • Specific features of the normal Newfoundland and Labrador climate can be either positive (beneficial), or negative (cause difficulties).
  • The Northeastern Newfoundland ecoregion covers the north shore of Newfoundland from the Northern Peninsula to Bonavista.
  • The Northern Peninsula ecoregion is located along the forested parts of the coastal lowlands of the Northern Peninsula.
  • The Paradise River ecoregion is located in the southeastern section of Labrador.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador climate during the fall season.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador climate during the spring season.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador climate during the summer season.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador climate during the winter season.
  • The climatic patterns of Newfoundland and Labrador are discussed here season by season, and are illustrated by maps and graphs.
  • Slope-stability or mass-movement problems occur where either sediment and/or rock and/or snow move downslope in response to gravity.
  • The Smallwood Reservoir/ Michikamau ecoregion can be divided into two section in Labrador.
  • South Avalon Burin Oceanic Barrens ecoregion covers the southern tips of the Avalon and Burin peninsulas.
  • This ecoregion covers the west coast of Newfoundland, south of the Northern Peninsula and west of the barrens of the southern...
  • The Taiga Shield Ecozone is located on both sides of Hudson Bay, with the eastern portion running into Labrador.
  • The Torngat Mountains ecoregion is located in the northernmost part of Labrador.
  • The Ungava Bay Basin ecoregion of Labrador extends northward from Schefferville and encompasses most of the Labrador Hills in northeastern Quebec.
  • This ecoregion extends northeast from Winokapau Lake and borders the western extensions of the Lake Melville ecoregion.
  • Much of our knowledge of daily life in outport Newfoundland in the late 18th and early 19th century comes from the pens of visitors. They were typically missionaries, explorers, naturalists, and geologists whose work brought them to outlying communities not often visited by outsiders or even the local government.
  • Considerable uncertainty surrounds our understanding of daily life in Newfoundland during the late 18th and early 19th centuries.